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OPENING RECEPTION: Saturday, July 13, 2 to 4 pm. Artists in Attendance

Bau-Xi Gallery's Toronto locations are in one of the most energetic artistic neighbourhoods in the city - in part because of its close proximity to the esteemed OCAD University. For the month of July, a selection of works by OCAD U's Drawing and Painting class of 2019 will be featured in their Upper Gallery. 

Email
toronto@bau-xi.com
Phone
416 977 0600
Website
https://bau-xi.com/
Date
-
Venue & Address
Bau-Xi Gallery
340 Dundas Street West, Toronto | Upper Floor Gallery
Type
Department
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EMERGING NOW: Selected Works from the OCAD U Drawing & Painting Class of 2019
Keywords
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ALMEDA: Up to the Sky Exhibition
 
February 1 to 9, 2023
Great Hall, Level 2, 100 McCaul Street
Opening Reception: February 1, 7 pm

 
This exhibition features artwork from the perspective/experiences of the Black student body at OCAD University. With strong influence from the “Black is Beautiful” movement of the 80s; our exhibition focuses on the beauty of individual truths. Our truth is what we say to ourselves when our social mask is off. How does the world perceive our physical attributes such as hair, culture and how do we internalize those experiences?

Participating artists:
Osatohmwen Adeniyi
Razan Ali
Brandon Baghaee
Kayla Bullen
Nicole David
Uzoma Ekpunobi
Wuliyah Hankey
Nai Faguharson
Pixel Heller
Steve Williams Jr.
Shem Joslyn
Jade Kent-Brewster
Jamilah Lambert
Tegra Ndala
Stella Mohire Obedi
Chimemelie Okafor
Shamika Pierre
Liyah Vaiti

Poster made by @ahmeddkm

To learn more about this student group and others at OCAD U, visit ocadu.ca/studentgroups

Date
-
Venue & Address
Great Hall, Level 2, 100 McCaul Street
Email
almedablacksu@gmail.com
Website
Type
Department
Keywords

A group show by student group Almeda Collective!

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Almeda: Up to the Sky
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more-than-human

February 01 to May 13, 2023 

Curated by Jane Tingley 

Core exhibition of the CONTACT Photography Festival 

more-than-human presents media artworks at the intersection of art, science, Indigenous worldviews, and technology that speculatively and poetically use multimodal storytelling as a vehicle for interpreting, mattering, and embodying more-than-human ecologies. The artworks in this exhibition aim to critically and emotionally engage with the important work of decentering the human and rethinking the perspective that sees nature as a lifeless resource for exploitation. Many of the artworks use technological and scientific tools as entry points for witnessing and interacting with these more-than-human worlds, as they help visualize phenomena beyond human sensory perception while nevertheless situating us within them. Combined, the artworks in the show weave a story that tells a tale of symbiosis, intersections, and more-than-human relationality. They incorporate scientific, philosophical, and Indigenous perspectives to create an experiential tapestry that asks the viewer to reconsider, reorient, and rethink relationships with the more-than-human. 

 more-than-human Online Exhibition Publication

more-than-human curator and artist 

An image of woman smiling with short brown hair. Next is graphic image of computerized natureImage Left to Right: Headshot of Jane Tingley. Jane Tingley with Faadhi Fauzi and Ilze (Kavi) Briede, (ex)tending towards, 2023, 3D visualization, cork, electronics, earth, point cloud. Photo by Jane Tingley.  

Jane Tingley is an artist, curator, Director of the SLOlab: Sympoietic Living Ontologies Lab and Associate Professor at York University. Her studio work combines traditional studio practice with new media tools - and spans responsive/interactive installation, performative robotics, and telematically connected distributed sculptures/installations. Her works is interdisciplinary in nature and explores the creation of spaces and experiences that push the boundaries between science and magic, interactivity, and playfulness, and offer an experience to the viewer that is accessible both intellectually and technologically. Using distributed technologies, her current work investigates the hidden complexity found in the natural world and explores the deep interconnections between the human and non-human relationships. As a curator her interests lie at the intersection art, science, and technology with a special interest in collaborative creativity as impetus for innovation and discovery. Recent exhibitions include Hedonistika (2014) at the Musée d’art contemporain (Mtl, CA), INTERACTION (2016) and Agents for Change (2020) at THE MUSEUM (Kitchener, CA). As an artist she has participated in exhibitions and festivals in the Americas, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe - including translife -International Triennial of Media Art at the National Art Museum of China, Beijing, Elektra Festival in Montréal (CA) and the Künstlerhause in Vienna (AT). She received the Kenneth Finkelstein Prize in Sculpture (CA), the first prize in the iNTERFACES – Interactive Art Competition (PT). 

more-than-human artists

Ursula Biemann

An image of a woman smiling with white hair at a camera. Next image of mirrored digitalized tree Image Left to Right: Ursula Biemann. Ursula, Biemann, Forest Mind, 2021, sync 2-channel video installation, 31 minutes.  

Ursula Biemann is an artist, author and video essayist. Her artistic practice is research oriented and involves fieldwork from Greenland to Amazonia, where she investigates climate change and the ecologies of oil, ice, forests and water. In her multi-layered videos, she interweaves vast cinematic landscapes with documentary footage, science fiction poetry and academic findings to narrate a changing planetary reality. In 2018, Biemann was commissioned by Museo de Arte, Universidad Nacional de Colombia in the co-creation of a new Indigenous University in the South of Colombia led by the Inga people in which she contributes the online platform Devenir Universidad. Her recent video installation Forest Mind (2021) emerges from this long-term collaboration. She has published numerous books, including Forest Mind (2022) and the audiovisual online monograph Becoming Earth on her ecological video works between 2011-2021. Biemann has exhibited internationally with recent solo exhibitions at MAMAC, Nice and the Centre culturel suisse, Paris. She is appointed Doctor honoris causa in Humanities by the Swedish University Umea, and has received the 2009 Prix Meret Oppenheim, the Swiss Grand Award for Art, and the 2022 Zurich Art Award. 

www.geobodies.org 

Lindsey french

Image of a woman with pixie haircut looking away from camera. Next image of crystallized branches Image Left to Right: Headshot of Lindsey french. Lindsey french, Phytovision, 2018-2019 

Lindsey french (she/they) is a settler artist, educator and writer whose work engages in multi- sensory signaling within ecological and technological systems. She has exhibited widely including at the Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), the International Museum of Surgical Science (Chicago), Pratt Manhattan Gallery (New York), the Miller Gallery for Contemporary Art (Pittsburgh), and SixtyEight Art Institute (Copenhagen). Recent publications include chapters for Ambiguous Territory: Architecture, Landscape, and the Postnatural (Actar, 2022), Olfactory Art and The Political in an Age of Resistance (Routledge, 2021), Why Look at Plants (Brill, 2019), and poetry for the journal Forty-Five. They earned an interdisciplinary BA in Environment, Interaction, and Design (Hampshire College), and an MFA in Art and Technology Studies (School of the Art Institute of Chicago). Newly based in the prairie landscape of Treaty 4 territory in Regina, Saskatchewan, french teaches as an Assistant Professor in Creative Technologies in the Faculty of Media, Art, and Performance at the University of Regina. 

www.lindseyfrench.com 

Grace Grothaus

Image of a woman with twin tail brown hair smiling while sitting nature. Next image of a close up of a leaf.

Image left to right: Headshot of Grace Grothaus. Grace Grothaus, Drawing, 2022, envirographic video installation. 

Grace Grothaus Is a computational media artist whose research explores ecosystemic human and plant relationships in relation to the present global climate crisis and speculative futures. She is interested in art’s potential to foster empathy with more-than-human worlds. Frequently collaborative, Grace works with scientists, engineers, musicians and other visual and performing artists. Her research-creation is expressed as physical computing installations which take place both outdoors or in the gallery and often center around the sensing and visualization of invisible environmental phenomena. Her artworks have been exhibited widely including at the International Symposium of Electronic Art (Barcelona, ES & Durban, SA), Environmental Crisis: Art & Science (London, UK), Cité Internationale des Arts (Paris, FR), and the World Creativity Biennale (Rio de Janiero, BR). Grothaus has received numerous awards including from the United States National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. Currently she is working towards a PhD in Digital Media from York University where she has been named a VISTA scholar and a Graduate Fellow of Academic Distinction. 

Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning & Mary Bunch

Three images: top two images are two women smiling at a camera. Bottom image of their digitalized work

Top Image Left to Right: Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning and Mary Bunch. Bottom Image: Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning and Mary Bunch, Emerging from the Water (beta version), 2022, virtual reality. Photo by Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning 

Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning is an interdisciplinary artist and Queen’s National Scholar in Anishinaabe Language, Knowledge, and Culture (ALKC) in the Department of Philosophy and Cultural Studies at Queen’s University. Manning has expertise in Anishinaabe ontology, mnidoo interrelationality, phenomenology, and art. A member of Kettle and Stoney Point First Nation, her primary philosophical influence and source of creativity is her early childhood grounding in Anishinaabe onto- epistemology. She is Principal Investigator of Earthdiver: Land-Based Worlding (MITACS), and Co-Investigator on Pluriversal Worlding with Extended Reality. Manning co-directs the cross- institutional Peripheral Visions Co-Lab (York and Queen’s). She is an affiliate of Revision Centre for Art and Social Justice, and Fellow of The International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI). 

Mary Bunch is a media artist, Canada Research Chair, and Associate Professor, Cinema and Media Arts at York University. Through theoretical inquiry and collaborative research creation, Bunch mobilizes queer, feminist, disability and decolonial frameworks to better understand peripheral worldmaking imaginaries in media arts and intermedial performance. She is co-editor of a special issue on Access Aesthetics in Public, Principal Investigator on the research creation project Pluriversal Worlding with Extended Reality (SSHRC Insight) and co-investigator on Earthdiver: Land- Based Worlding (MITACS). Dr Bunch is co-director of the Peripheral Visions Co- Lab, Executive Committee member of Sensorium: Centre for Digital Arts and Technology, a core member of Vision: Science to Applications (VISTA), a Fellow at the Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, and an Affiliate of Revision Centre for Art and Social Justice. 

Suzanne Morrissette

An image of woman with long black hair wearing eye glasses smiling at a camera. Next image: close of shot of grass

Image Left to Right: Headshot of Suzanne Morrissette. Suzanne Morrissette, one and the same, 2016, interactive installation with Kinect and MAX. Image by Toni Hafkenscheid 

Suzanne Morrissette (she/her) (she/her) is an artist, curator, and scholar who is currently based out of Toronto. Her father’s parents were Michif- and Cree-speaking Metis with family histories tied to the Interlake and Red River regions and Scrip in the area now known as Manitoba. Her mother’s parents came from Canadian-born farming families descended from United Empire loyalists and Mennonites from Russia. Morrissette was born and raised in Winnipeg and is a citizen of the Manitoba Metis Federation. As an artistic researcher Suzanne’s interests include: family and community knowledge, methods of translation, the telling of in-between histories, and practices of making that support and sustain life. Her two recent solo exhibitions, What does good work look like? and translations recently opened in Toronto (Gallery 44) and Montreal (daphne art centre) respectively. Her work has appeared in numerous group exhibitions such as Lii Zoot Tayr (Other Worlds), an exhibition of Metis artists working with concepts of the unknowable, and the group exhibition of audio-based work about waterways called FLOW with imagineNATIVE Film + Media Art Festival. Morrissette holds a PhD from York University in Social and Political Thought. She currently holds the position of Assistant Professor and Graduate Program Director for the Criticism and Curatorial Practices and Contemporary Art, Design, and New Media Histories Masters programs at OCAD University. 

www.suzannemorrissette.com 

Joel Ong

An image of a man with short black hair smiling. Next image is digitalized close up microscopic leave

Image Left to Right: Headshot of Joel Ong. Joel Ong, Untitled Interspecies Umwelten, 2021- photo still of live microscopic feed. Photo by Joel Ong.  

Joel Ong (PhD, MSc.Bioart) is a media artist whose works connect scientific and artistic approaches to the environment, developed from more than a decade of explorations in sound, installation and socially conscious art. His conceptual explorations revolve around metaphors of distance, connectivity, assiduously reworking this notion of the ‘environment’ - how different tools and scales of observation reveal diverse biotic and abiotic relationalities, and how these continually oscillate between natural and computational worlds. His works have been shown at internationally at the Currents New Media Festival, Nuit Blanche Toronto, Seattle Art Museum, the Gregg Museum of Art and Design, the Penny Stamps Gallery and the Ontario Science Centre etc. Joel is Associate Professor in Computational Arts and Director of Sensorium:The Centre for Digital Arts and Technology at York University, in Toronto, Canada. His research has been funded by such as SSHRC, eCampus Ontario, Women and Gender Equality Canada.   

Raitis Smits & Rasa Smite

Top image of a man and a woman sitting while looking at a camera. Bottom image of is VR image of their nature work

Top Image Left to Right: Raitis Smits & Rasa Smite.  

Bottom Image: Rasa Smite & Raitis Smits, Atmospheric Forest, 2020, immersive VR installation 

Rasa Smite and Raitis Smits are Riga and Karlsruhe based artists and co-founders of RIXC Center for New Media Culture in Riga, co-curators of RIXC Art and Science Festival, chief-editors of Acoustic Space, as well as co-chairs of recently founded NAIA - Naturally Artificial Intelligence Art association in Karlsruhe, Germany. Together they create visionary and networked artworks – from pioneering internet radio experiments in 1990s, to artistic investigations in electromagnetic spectrum and collaborations with radio astronomers, and more recent “techno-ecological” explorations. Their projects have been nominated (Purvitis Prize 2019, 2021, International Public Arts Award - Euroasia region 2021), awarded (Ars Electronica 1998, Falling Walls - Science Breakthrough 2021) and shown widely including at the Venice Architecture Biennale, Latvian National Museum of Arts, House of Electronic Arts in Basel, Ars Electronica Festival in Linz, and other venues, exhibitions and festivals in Europe, US, Canada and Asia. More recently they both also have been lecturers in MIT ACT - Art Culture Technology program (2018-2021), Boston.

Rasa Smite holds a PhD in sociology of media and culture; her thesis Creative Networks. In the Rear-View Mirror of Eastern European History (11) has been published by The Amsterdam Institute for Network Cultures. Currently she is a Professor of New Media Art at Liepaja University, and Senior Researcher at FHNW Academy of Art and Design in Basel, Switzerland. 

Raitis Smits holds his doctoral degree in arts, and he is a Professor at the Art Academy of Latvia. In 2017 Raitis was a Fulbright Researcher in the Graduate Center of NYC. 

www.smitesmits.com | www.rixc.org 

Upcoming Free Public Events 

Opening Reception – Wednesday, February 01, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond Street West   

Join us for the public launch of the exhibition, with a land acknowledgement and opening remarks.   

more-than human Artists Panel Discussion Part 1  – Thursday, February 02, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.  at Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond Street West) and Live Streamed Online   

Artists Rasa Smite & Raitis Smits, Grace Grothaus, Suzanne Morrissette and Lindsey french introduce their works exhibited in more-than-human and engage in a discussion about their practice. Moderated by Jane Tingley.

Register here: https://bit.ly/3G7xJ65

Multiplicities and plurality: Curator Jane Tingley in Conversation with Dr. Karen Houle  – Thursday, March 23, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond Street West   

Join Dr Karen Houle for an introductory talk on basic premises of Cartesian humanism followed by an exhibition tour discussion of the artworks in that context with Jane Tingley.   

Register here: https://bit.ly/3ZFhVPI

Screening of Forest Mind followed by Q+A with Ursula Biemann – Friday, April 07, 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond Street West) and Live Streamed Online   

Forest Mind (31 minutes) tackles the underlying concepts that distinguish the Indigenous knowledge systems from that of modern science, gaging the limits of rationalism which has dominated Western thinking for the last 200 years.  

Register here: https://bit.ly/3ipAWVC

more-than human Artists Panel Discussion Part 2   – Saturday, April 29, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  at Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond Street West) and Live Streamed Online   

Artists Joel Ong, Jane Tingley, Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning and Mary Bunch introduce their artworks their works exhibited in more-than-human and engage in a discussion about their practice. Moderated by Lisa Deanne Smith.

Register Here: https://bit.ly/3QwLRsW

Guided Nature and Forest Therapy Walk – Saturday, May 13, 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.  at High Park, 1873 Bloor Street West  

Join us for a slow paced, sensory-based guided walk that connects you with the healing power of the natural world. Space is limited, advance registration required.   

Registration is limited, free tickets will be released on 1 April at 12 p.m.: https://bit.ly/3XlyOga

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Date
-
Venue & Address
Onsite Gallery
199 Richmond Street West
Cost
Free
Email
onsite@ocadu.ca
Type
Department
Keywords

Onsite Gallery presents more-than-human curated by artist/researcher Jane Tingley from York University 

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more-than-human. Image: Rasa Smite & Raitis Smits, Atmospheric Forest, 2020, immersive VR installation
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The Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto and the Korean Office for Research and Education, York University in partnership with OCADU University's Art & Social Change, Faculty of Art presents:

COMFORT
a documentary by Emmanuel Moonchil Park.

"COMFORT" (2020), tells the life story of the late Kim Soo Nak, a survivor of the "comfort women" system of sexual slavery set up by the Japanese Imperial government during World War II.

This is the first event in a programme series connected to the exhibition of The Statue of the Girl of Peace at OCAD University by the artists Kim Seo-Kyung and Kim Eun-Sung. The statue is a symbol of the flight for justice led by surviving 'comfort women' and their allies for redress from the Japanese government. 

Poster of COMFORT screening
  • Friday, January 13, 2023, 7 PM - 9:30 PM
  • OCAD University, 100 McCaul St., Main Floor Auditorium
  • Screening, Reception and Post-Screening Talk with the Director

The Statue of the Girl of Peace is on view at OCAD University (100 McCaul Street) in the main lobby from January 5 - April 28, 2023.

The Statue of the Girl of Peace
Oil on fiberglass-reinforced polyester (FRP) and stone powder 160x 180x 125 cm
2017 (The original bronze statue 2011)

On Wednesday, January 8, 1992, thousands of protestors rallied in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul, South Korea to demand redress from the Japanese government for the large-scale system of sexual servitude setup and operated by the Japanese Imperial rule during World War II. The Japanese military abducted an estimated 200,000 girls and women from across the Asia-Pacific region who were euphemistically called “comfort women” and forced into sexual slavery. In 2011 the artists installed the bronze ‘Statue of Peace’ in front of the embassy where it remains today. The statue is a powerful symbol of the redress movement, there are version of the statue sited around the world, from Germany to the United States, Australia and Canada.

The Wednesday Demonstrations have turned into a weekly protest in Korea and are led by the remaining survivors. The Statue of the Girl of Peace was created on the occasion of the 1000th protest as a tribute to the spirit and the deep history of the Wednesday Demonstrations, which continue today. The survivors' ongoing fight for justice is a fight against militarized gender-based sexual violence everywhere.

The empty chair beside the statue is an invitation to you to sit beside the Girl and support the call for redress for the so- called ‘comfort women’. Please take a photo and share it on social media using the hashtags: #statueofpeace #justiceforcomfortwomen

Date
-
Venue & Address
OCAD University, 100 McCaul St. Main Floor Auditorium
Cost
Free
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

The Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto and the Korean Office for Research and Education, York University in partnership with OCADU University's Art & Social Change, Faculty of Art presents:

COMFORT
a documentary by Emmanuel Moonchil Park.

  • Friday, January 13, 2023, 7 PM - 9:30 PM
  • OCAD University, 100 McCaul St., Main Floor Auditorium
  • Screening, Reception and Post-Screening Talk with the Director

 

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Documentary Screening - Comfort
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Documentary Screening - Comfort
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Khadejha McCall, Untitled, Silkscreen on canvas, 2000. Photo credit: Chiedza Pasipanodya


Practice as Ritual / Ritual as Practice

Practice as Ritual / Ritual as Practice is a group exhibition at A Space Gallery, featuring the works of 10 Black women artists who participated in the historical 1989 DAWA Collective exhibition, and curated by Dr. Andrea Fatona. 

Featured Artists
Buseje Bailey, Marie Booker, Claire Carew, Grace Channer, Dzi…An, Khadejha McCall, Mosa McNeilly, Chloe Onari, Barbara Prézeau Stephenson, Winsom Winsom

A Space Gallery
November 24, 2022 – February 23, 2023
Reception: November 24, 2022, 7 to 9 pm
Curated by Dr. Andrea Fatona, founder of the Centre for the Study of Black Canadian Diaspora and Associate Professor in the Faculty of Art at OCAD U

The exhibition takes place in A Space Main Gallery, Vitrines, and the 401 front lobby exhibition space.

Dedicated to the memory of Khadejha McCall and Chloe Onari

Exhibition Summary
Practice as Ritual / Ritual as Practice is a group exhibition at A Space Gallery, featuring the works of 10 Black women artists who participated in the historical 1989 DAWA Collective exhibition, Black Wimmin: When and Where We Enter, the first national exhibition to address the exclusion of Black women artists from the visual landscape of Canada.

The exhibition attests to and affirms the artists’ sustained practice of producing art that articulates the heterogeneity of perspectives and forms that constitute Black Canadian women’s art today. The works in the exhibition comprise of paintings, photography, text, installations, video, augmented reality, and sculpture. The title of the exhibition refers to the overarching theme that emerges in the works – one of tending to Black histories, presents, and futures through the practice of artmaking – and the labour involved in such a practice.

This touring exhibition project is coordinated by DAWA, the regrouped collective formed in 2019.

Thank you to the Toronto Arts Council, the Ontario Arts Council, the Canada Council for the Arts, and the Centre for the Study of Black Canadian Diaspora for their generous support. 

Biographies

Buseje Bailey works across a variety of media attempting to grasp the knowledge of the African diasporic humanity in this modern environment, and with its complexity, diversity, and vulnerabilities. Bailey explores the hybridity of her identities – Afro-Jamaican, woman, Canadian, etc. – and how she engages with each label /identity when called upon in her work. She applies the relevant medium with the awareness of exploitation, reflecting on the wider community and the implication of her work on the diaspora, of which she is a part of. Bailey’s creations rest between the transitional space of being and becoming, where one label stops and the other begins, with questions such as, “Who am I? Who they are? And who do they believe me/we to be?” at each intersection. Working with lens-based media such as photo and video, she draws inspiration from mainstream media offering that “The very media used to categorize and label… I’ve used to galvanize my reaction.”

Marie Booker’s ritual garments, textiles, regalia, performance artist designs and drawings express her affinity to nature, whilst melding in her ancestral lineage and dreamtime recollections. Since the late 1980s and influenced by her dear friend and mentor, textile artist Chloe Onari, Booker has worked with plant life to colour her garments. Booker is also a percussionist and Master Gardener. Moving her focus from djembe, dun dun set, and the krin, she is presently teaching herself the balafon as well as creating a public “kitchen garden” planted with Virginia First Nations and Enslaved African healing herbs and foods. The hues of Booker’s current work are achieved with madder and plant life from her garden and adorned with bones and found objects such as feathers and shells. Ebe Yiye! (It will get better!)

Claire Carew is an artist and poet. As a visual artist, she specializes in oil painting and sculpture. Since the 1980s, Carew has exhibited extensively including significant events such as the Romerias de Mayo festival and a solo exhibition in Holguin, Cuba in tribute to the Indigenous peoples of the Americas. Taking the adventurous road, Carew also travels globally; often alone seeking out beauty and remnants of times past in several countries, which she says is “Challenging at times yet rewarding.” Carew obtained her Masters of Fine Arts in San Miguel de Allende, México after successfully completing her studies at McGill University. Her paintings and sculptures are held in private collections and public institutions internationally and her poetry and art have been published in textbooks and magazines. Carew is a professional artist who continues to work in Canada and México creating visionary work to inspire many.

Grace Channer
When the imagination is fully engaged, art becomes a process of transformation and transforming the world. Nothing changes without first imagining that it can be changed. A vision of oneself as capable of spinning 540° in the air; or riding a bicycle 140 kms from Toronto to Niagara Falls; or demonstrating in the streets with others in the belief that our voices might be heard; emerges through an imaginative process of hope, consciousness, thinking and love. Grace Channer’s interdisciplinary art practice is research-based, art-led, and located in a transnational, black, queer, diasporic, aesthetic experience. Her work is both critically and theoretically engaged in activism and social justice issues, community, and public art.

At the centre of DZI..AN’s practice is an inquiry: “What makes humans vibrate?” With an interest in creating powerful forms, she has been creating life-size sculptures for decades that encourage viewers to reflect on human rhythms. Working with a variety of materials, DZI..AN holds a keen interest in elements and materials such as earth, air, wood, metal and felt. Her interest in the thousand year-old medium of felting acts as a base material for these life-size sculptures, the size creating a familiar intimacy between viewers and the works. When working with metal, DZI..AN likens it to “drawing in space.”… I centre them on a balance point so they can vibrate in the wind.” DZI..AN’s environmental sculptures aim to invite viewers into the adventure of a moment, into an impression and may even stimulate the urge to whisper something to the objects as one is leaving.

Khadejha McCall was an artist and educator who began working with fibres as a medium in 1958. After a number of years of research and exploration with this medium, she excelled, consistently pushing the limits of the textiles she worked with. Khadejha came to be known for integrating third-generation photographic etching into her work through a fusion of silk screen and painting techniques, achieving a depth of recurring motifs through a methodical layering and painting over. Khadejha integrated family photos with Yoruba symbols from West Africa; these symbols profoundly linked to the family collective memory. Her work is a tribute to African diasporic historical continuity and rituals of memory, forming a spiritual foundation grounded in a Black feminist politic. Khadejha studied at Parsons School of Design and received a Bachelor of Arts from Concordia University and a Masters of Education from McGill University. She exhibited extensively throughout Canada and the United States for over 50 years.

Mosa McNeilly is an artist, educator, and editor. In her interdisciplinary research, she brings encaustic, assemblage, and installation into conversation with clown, movement, and voice. In her Middle Passage memory work, Mosa reimagines the poetics of memorialization. Employing hybrid iconographies, she explores community activations of her installation as an embodied mourning praxis. Reflective of a creative practice that merges with ceremonial practice, Mosa’s work brings about an integration of the material with the ethereal. Grounded in the reparative labour of gathering and assembling, her work contemplates fragmentation and gestures toward wholeness. Mosa has exhibited at A Space Gallery, Harbourfront Centre, and Zig Zag Gallery, Toronto, and has performed at Lloyd Best Institute, Trinidad. Featured in Cosmic Underground Northside and Nuances of Blackness in the Canadian Academy, she has spoken at OCAD University, Dalhousie University, and Axené07 Gallery. The Hamilton Arts Council artist-in-residence 2021-22, Mosa holds an MES from York University.

Chloe Onari (born Clomin Onari Marshall) was an artist, trained nurse, and community builder with a multidisciplinary arts practice that spanned over 50 years. Chloe began her exploration of surface design and textile arts in the early 1970s using self-taught methods including working with natural dyes, batik, silkscreen, weaving, knitting, and jewelry. Throughout the 1990s, Chloe made several trips to Africa to further her learning and connections with Nigerian textile artists including Nike Olaniyi and Isaac Ojo Fajana. Chloe continued to expand her creative expression to include national-scale Canadian exhibitions, curation, community building, workshop coordination, and instructing with the Toronto District School Board. At the 1992 CELAFI (Festivals in Celebration of African Identity), she curated the Affinity exhibition for the Ontario Ministry of Culture and Communications. Living with Alzheimer’s for many years, Chloe Onari was cared for by her daughters, Karla and Natasha Smith in Toronto, Ontario.

Barbara Prézeau Stephenson has exhibited at the Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA, California, USA), Wallach Art Gallery of Columbia University (New York, USA), FROST Art Museum (Miami, USA), Grand Palais Museum (Paris, France), Museum of Haitian Art and MUPANAH (Haiti), as well as the Biennials of Havana, Dakar, Venice and Mercosur. In 1999, Prézeau Stephenson founded the cultural centre AfricAméricA Foundation, now the Georges Liautaud Community Museum in Haiti. In 2000, she launched the Transcultural Forum for Contemporary Art in Haiti. In Canada, she is a member of DAWA (2019 regrouping). She has published articles and books on contemporary art in the Caribbean and Haiti. Prézeau Stephenson is a current recipient of the Research and Creation Grant, Canada Council for the Arts.

Winsom Winsom does not separate her life and her art. Her life is her art – Her art is her life. Winsom’s work interprets the elements, land, animal, and human presence from the context of the Afro-centric value system where spirituality is central as “respect for the elements guides human passage.” Through a variety of media such as painting, sculpture, film and installation, connections are established between different levels of existence through symbols in line and colour. Winsom’s current imagery can be ascribed directly to the ancient African religion of Ifá and the Ashanti which have mediated the relationship between the land of the living and the dead with an organic living structure. Winsom studied at the Jamaica School of Art and received formal training guided by Barrington Watson and Albert Huie. In 2015, Winsom received an Honorary Doctorate from OCAD University and in 2018 exhibited “I Rise”, a major solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Andrea Fatona is an independent curator and associate professor at OCAD University. Fatona was the former curator of contemporary art at the Ottawa Art Gallery, and has worked as the programme director at Video In, Vancouver, Co-Director of Artspeak Gallery, Vancouver, and Artistic Director of Artspace Gallery, Peterborough. Her curatorial practice is concerned with creating spaces of engagement for Black cultural producers in Canada. Some examples of her curatorial projects include: Queer Collaborations (1993), Across Borders (1995/6), Cadboro Bay: Index to an Incomplete History (1999), The Attack of the Sandwich Men (2001), Reading the Image: Poetics of the Black Diaspora (2006-2008), Fibred Optics (2009-10), Will Work for Food (2011), Land Marks (2013-14), Settling in Place (2018), and Winsom: I Rise (2018). Fatona is a Canada Research Chair, Tier II in Black Canadian Diasporic Cultural Production.

Date
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Venue & Address
A Space Gallery
401 Richmond St W
Toronto, ON
The exhibition takes place in A Space Main Gallery, Vitrines, and the 401 front lobby exhibition space.
Cost
Free
Website
Type
Keywords

Practice as Ritual / Ritual as Practice is a group exhibition at A Space Gallery, featuring the works of 10 Black women artists who participated in the historical 1989 DAWA Collective exhibition, and curated by Dr. Andrea Fatona. 

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Khadejha McCall, Untitled
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Digitial collage of a person on their knees on a soapy floor with lines rendered digitally on top of the image.

Office of Diversity, Equity & Sustainability Initiatives (ODESI) Gallery
100 McCaul, Room 316
Step on a crack...
October 6 to December 2, 2022

Featuring the work of Faculty of Art Assistant Professor Pam Patterson.

This exhibition features multi-media works by queer disability artist Pam Patterson that capture physical and visual (dis)ability perceptions.

Date
-
Venue & Address
Office of Diversity, Equity & Sustainability Initiatives
100 McCaul St., Room 316
Toronto ON M5T 1W1
Cost
FREE
Email
vho@ocadu.ca
Website
Type
Department

This exhibition features multi-media works by queer disability artist Pam Patterson that capture physical and visual (dis)ability perceptions.

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Image
Drawing on water #4 (2022) by Pam Patterson, digital collage using drawing and performance documentation.
Body

Cathy Daley: Undiscovered: A Memorial Survey

October 20–November 26, 2022
Opening reception Thursday, October 20 from 6 to 8 pm

Birch Contemporary 
129 Tecumseth St, Toronto M6J2H2

Image Credits: Cathy Daley Untitled (stack), 2011, 25" × 85", acrylic and collage on canvas SOLD: BMO, collection

Date
-
Venue & Address
Birch Contemporary
129 Tecumseth St, Toronto M6J2H2
Cost
Free
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

Cathy Daley: Undiscovered: A Memorial Survey

October 20–November 26, 2022
Opening reception Thursday, October 20 from 6 to 8 pm

 

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Cathy Daley: Undiscovered: A Memorial Survey
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Cathy Daley: Undiscovered: A Memorial Survey
Body

Ginette Legaré’s solo exhibition, SUPPLY CHAINS, will take place at BIRCH CONTEMPORARY East gallery, from October 20 to November 26, 2022, with an opening reception on Thursday, October 20th, from 6 to 8 p.m. BIRCH CONTEMPORARY is located at 129 Tecumseth Street, Toronto, and gallery hours are from Thursday to Saturday, from 11 a.m to 6 p.m.

SUPPLY CHAINS

Ginette Legaré’s latest body of work consists of sculptures and large scale installations drawn from reclaimed metal and wire objects. These redeployed and reconfigured fragments, now linked up beyond their expired functions, re-member lived material exchanges. As such exchanges tentatively inhabit the everchanging vocabulary of discards, they silently suggest the “chains” of longings, pasts, and futures inscribed at the core of our dependence on replaceable goods and networks.

The artist acknowledges the generous support from the Ontario Arts Council.

Date
-
Venue & Address
129 Tecumseth Street, Toronto
M6J 2H2
Cost
Free
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

Ginette Legaré’s solo exhibition, SUPPLY CHAINS, will take place at BIRCH CONTEMPORARY East gallery, from October 20 to November 26, 2022, with an opening reception on Thursday, October 20th, from 6 to 8 p.m. BIRCH CONTEMPORARY is located at 129 Tecumseth Street, Toronto, and gallery hours are from Thursday to Saturday, from 11 a.m to 6 p.m.

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Ginette Legaré’s solo exhibition - SUPPLY CHAINS
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Supply chains
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Wunderkammer

Works by Marli Davis, Elizabeth DeCoste, Laur Flom, Em Moor.

Sep 06 - Oct 09
Weekdays: 8am - 7pm, Sat & Sun: 12 - 6pm
Reception: Sep 28: 4 - 6pm

Exploring the storytelling abilities of collections, the artists in Wunderkammer repurpose the scientific method as a means of self-discovery. By appropriating methodologies from a rich historical exhibition tradition, the artists use the aesthetics of scientific classification and museum display to draw attention to gaps and erasures within collection practices. As such they are able to re-tell histories, establishing an alternative form of storytelling to the dominating Western practices of display and classification, without writing off those practices entirely. Artists Laur Flom, Elizabeth DeCoste, Em Moor, and Marli Davis draw us into their worlds with installation, video, and archives filled with detritus and memorabilia. These works poke fun at the glorifying potential of the fantastical collector, showing us that it is not the individual objects that are deserving of the title ‘artifact’, but their personal and collective significance which offers us a genealogical path toward introspection.  

Curated: Morgan Mavis, Tibi Neuspiel

Date
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Venue & Address
Ignite Gallery !00 McCaul 2nd floor
Website
Type
Department
Keywords
Banner Image
Wunderkammer
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Wunderkammer
Body

The recent regulated and confining pandemic years have operated to aggravate already existing anthropogenic anxieties. Climate change – oppressive unpredictable heat waves, uncontrolled forest fires, rising oceans levels – have had an impact on the race that both facilitated it and now roils from its effects. Aggressive urban sprawl bulldozes the land, and we search from among the rubble to find what of “land” remains. In Canada, the colonial project created divisiveness, poverty, and an early death for some, but also vast wealth and proprietorship for others. Can this unsettling situation be unraveled, or have we gone too far?

Date
-
Venue & Address
113Research, 113 McCaul Street, 5th Floor

OCAD University, Toronto.
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

Anthropogenic Anxiety

Exhibit opening September 22, 2022, running to Dec. 2023.
Pam Patterson & Sasha Shevchenko (OCADU), Joanna Black & Sarah Paradis (University of Manitoba)

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113 Research - Reaper - Pam P
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113 Research- Reaper - Pam P

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