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In a 1965 radio interview, Belgian Surrealist René Magritte provided the following, somewhat abstruse, description of his decision to paint a bright green apple over the face of his now iconic self-portrait The Son of Man:

At least it hides the face partly well, so you have the apparent face, the apple, hiding the visible but hidden, the face of the person. It’s something that happens constantly. Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see. There is an interest in that which is hidden and which the visible does not show us. This interest can take the form of a quite intense feeling, a sort of conflict, one might say, between the visible that is hidden and the visible that is present.

This tension between what is hidden and what is revealed was a key element in the work of the original Surrealists and continues to motivate the artists featured in Everything we see hides another thing. The works combine material play, abstraction and an oscillation between control and chance with a strong sense of the personal. They use gesture, in all its forms, as a tool for experimentation. They fetishize the things that hide, are hidden and hold. They take what they see and reconfigure it, drawing attention to the physical and psychic consequences of the everyday and contributing to the sovereignty of questions over answers.

The exhibition continues until March 9.

Email
info@mkg127.com
Phone
647.435.7682
Website
http://mkg127.com/archive/2019-2/everything-we-see-hides-another-thing/
Date
-
Venue & Address
MKG127
1445 Dundas St. W
Toronto, Ontario
Type
Department
Image
detail of colourful abstract artwork
Keywords

The art collection at Four Seasons Toronto has been curated to showcase some of Canada’s many wonderful artists and craftspeople. The collection is meant to intrigue and inspire — with the overall theme being a subtle and contemporary whisper to that of the “Canadiana”. We would like to further this intention by featuring the work of emerging Canadian artists in a rotating art installation in d|bar.

All submissions are to be received at Four Seasons Corporate Home Offices no later than February 19, 2019 at 3:00pm. Please email to kai.fejer@fourseasons.com

*Participants in the competition will be recent graduates and faculty of OCAD. * The challenge: to capture the heart and spirit of our beloved Toronto, Ontario, Canada. *Entries are restricted only by the proportion of the screen. *The artwork may be representational, abstract, or conceptual; it can be adapted from a previous work by the artist or may be an entirely new piece. It may also be time-based media. In all cases, it must be appropriate for this venue (with 1 day and 2 night time concepts). *The artwork may be stills in sequence or a reel on a loop. *The competition will be a 2-stage jury. The jury will select a final short-list from all competition entries. *Short-listed artists will each receive $2,000 to finalize their proposed piece in 3 versions: 1 day and 2 night time concepts. Four Seasons will have ownership, including all copyright herein, of the Artist’s Artwork installed at the media wall in d|bar as a result of being selected as part of the short-list. Four Seasons will ensure that the Artist’s name and title of the Artwork is identi-fied in photographs, video or other media of the Artwork for promotional purposes or otherwise.

Competition brief and specifications attached.

Email
kai.fejer@fourseasons.com
Date
Venue & Address
d|bar
Four Seasons Hotel
Toronto, ON
Type
Department
Image
photo of d bar at four seasons hotel
Document
FSH Toronto Art Installation Design Competition Brief a.pdf
Keywords

OCAD University will celebrate Black History Month, this year, through Black Richness: The Untapped Potential of Our Ancestry, an exhibition which addresses what Black Richness means to our community in regards to economic, cultural and ancestral wealth, while reflecting on where we are today. If we must move forward we have to address the past.

The exhibition, curated by students of the OCADU BLXCK ASSOCIATION, Ehiko Odeh and Kaylee Meyer, features 15 Artists, who through different mediums, explore themes of Blackness in Canada, from different parts of the world, Black wealth, employment, culture and tradition, education, the effects of colonialism and how it affects black identities alongside stereotypes of black people, while aiming to celebrate the present.

The exhibition is spread throughout multiple locations on the OCAD University campus: the Main Lobby at 100 McCaul St., and the Ada Slaight Gallery on the 2nd Floor of 100 McCaul St.

Opening Reception

Friday, February 1st 5:30 p.m. – 11p.m. 100 McCaul St. Main Lobby

Timeline of the Opening Night Opening and arrival of people from 5:30 p.m.

Ceremony 6:00 p.m. – 6:35 p.m.

Art, Social, Food & Music 6:35 p.m. – 11p.m.

Part 2 of Black Richness Exhibition Available

Monday, February 18th – March 1st 100 McCaul St. 2nd floor Ada Slaight Gallery

Black Richness is generously sponsored by the OCADU Student Union Grant, Faculties of Art, Design & Liberal Arts & Sciences, Office of the President and OCADU Diversity, Equity & Sustainability Initiatives.

Date
-
Venue & Address
100 McCaul St. lobby and Ada Slaight Gallery
Department
Image
ocadu
Poster
Black History Month exhibition poster
Keywords

Manga, or Japanese comics, is one of Japan’s most recognizable cultural exports. In 2009, The Japan Times claimed that manga was the heart of Japanese popular culture. Although much has been written on its status as a lucrative global phenomenon, only a few scholars are interested in tracing its movement through art history.

In this talk, Dr. Max Dionisio, East Asian Librarian at the Royal Ontario Museum, and Adjunct Professor at the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto, examines the diverse historical and artistic roots of modern manga. We will see how ancient Japanese narrative scrolls, Buddhist paintings, Edo period (1600-1868) prints, late 19th-century political cartoons, and early 20th-century comic strips helped to lay the foundation for the creation of one of the most popular reading forms of today. We will also consider the differences and changing attitudes toward visual literacy in Japan and in North America. About Max Dionisio After earning his doctorate in Japanese studies, Dr. Dionisio came to Canada in 2007 to attend library school at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information. Before joining the ROM in 2015, Dr. Dionisio was Assistant Librarian at Upper Canada College in charge of technical services. He is also a sessional instructor at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information where he teaches courses on advanced cataloguing, comic books, and book history. Dr. Dionisio is currently researching early 17th-century Japanese Christian art and the material history of the Japanese Christian persecutions of the mid 17th-century.

This free public lecture is produced with the support of the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies and the Visual and Critical Studies Program.

Cost
FREE
Email
folas@ocadu.ca
Website
https://www.facebook.com/events/681852562211686/
Date
-
Venue & Address
100 McCaul St., Room 230
Type
Department
Image
Part of a Japanese scroll of a frog and rabbit chasing a monkey
Poster
Max Dionisio bespectacled and smiling in front of a book case
Keywords

On Location: Artists Explore a Sense of Place

Opening February 3, 2019 

Glenbow’s collection of modernist and contemporary art provides the source material for an expansive exploration of different kinds of places, both remote and lived in; pristine and altered. A classic Canadian vista by Lawren Harris is juxtaposed with Eleanor Bond’s abstracted cityscape, Edward Burtynsky’s photographic study of the Carrara marble quarry and a sculptural work by Faye Heavyshield which encompasses the land itself as material for its construction. 

Drawn from Glenbow’s collection, and including works by Canadian and international artists spanning eight decades, On Location is a rich survey of modernist and contemporary artworks that use notions of place and the spaces we inhabit as a point of departure.

Expanding upon the beloved and well-worn trope of landscape within Canadian art and culture, On Location looks beyond the scenic toward the social, material, political, geographical and personal factors that shape places and our connections to them. These artworks engage with a plural conception of place beyond landscape – place as a physical location, a contested territory, an ecosystem, a human-made architectural space, a state of mind.

The artists in On Location work with spaces both real and imagined, from colonized landscapes, to impossible cities, to sublime vistas, to dreamlike interiors. These artworks are shaped by memory, collective histories and political forces, addressing what it means to be located within a specific space and to experience dislocation. The exhibition raises questions around how we collectively and individually relate to the environments we inhabit. This is a symbiotic relationship, demonstrating how we, as humans, construct a sense of place and how, in turn, these places ultimately shape us.

Exhibition Artists

Vicky Alexander, Karoo Ashevak, Maxwell Bates, Eleanor Bond, Paul-Emile Borduas, Edward Burtynsky, Emily Carr, Victor Cicansky, Lynn Cohen, L. Lemoine Fitzgerald, Tanya Harnett, Lawren Harris, Faye Heavyshield, Fred Herzog, Illingworth Kerr, Roy Kiyooka, Glenn Lewis, J.E.H. MacDonald, Kimowan Metchewais, Laura Millard, Ron Moppett, Marion Nicoll, Christopher Pratt, Mario Reis, Allen Sapp, Takao Tanabe, David Thauberger, Jeff Thomas, Jin-Me Yoon

Website
https://www.glenbow.org/exhibitions/on-location/
Date
Venue & Address
The Glenbow Museum.
130 - 9 Avenue S.E.
Calgary, Alberta
Type
Department
Image
ocadu
Poster
photograph of circular markings in a snowy landscape with two deer crossing
Keywords

OCAD U/AGO Art Education Learning Partnership Symposium:   Global Indigeneity: De-Colonialization, Reconciliation, & Issues of Appropriation

Feb 12, 12:00 - 2pm Weston Family Learning Centre, Art Gallery of Ontario

Free - Open to OCADU and AGO communities

Art & Design Education Lab: AGO, a collaborative cross-disciplinary course co-facilitated in partnership between the AGO and OCADU, has, over the last decade, presented a number of symposia with the intention of de/re-constructing knowledges and energizing our communities around teaching and learning. This symposium features a presentation by speaker Nadia McLaren, Indigenous artist and educational developer, OCADU and a gallery tour facilitated by artist and AGO art educator Paula Gonzales-Ossa. Please join us for this free event in the Weston Family Learning Centre Seminar Room at the AGO.

Nadia McLaren

Nadia is an Anishnaabe whose family roots are in Heron Bay, Pic River located on the North Shore of Lake Superior. She grew up in small towns across Northwestern Ontario and calls Sioux Lookout home. Nadia is a mother of two, a Drawing and Painting graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design, a published author and is currently finishing a graphic novel entitled, “Ever Good,” which was awarded a grant from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission as a project of commemoration.

As Educational Developer (Indigenous Learning), Nadia brings deep knowledge and experience in the areas of Indigenous pedagogy, professional development and community engagement to her work. Nadia is an accomplished educator, artist and storyteller with more than 15 years’ experience working in Indigenous educational contexts. She is also the creator (writer/director/producer) of an award-winning documentary, “Muffins for Granny,” (Mongrel Media 2007). This documentary involved extensive research with community Elders and residential school survivors, was the recipient of a prestigious Aboriginal Healing Foundation grant and is part of the esteemed Criterion Collection.

Paula Gonzalez-Ossa is a visual arts instructor and mentoring artist at Na Me Res Sagatay Native Men's Residence. She has had 17 years of experience as a Community Youth Worker with youth at risk in Toronto's West. She is also a mural artist who has been working with many communities producing street level public art, both in Canada and Latin America for over 25 years. Her works, like the most recent 500 ft. mural titled "Our Medicines", located at the underpass at Dupont and Shaw, or "The Ancestral Tree Spirits" located at the Nordheimer Ravine's TTC station exit, depict a colourful First Nations cosmovision in relation to the Original lands of Ontario. She worked closely in creating this work with Anishnawbe mentors, Elders and Knowledge Keepers. She is currently developing a documentary about public art and protocol in the use of Ancestral Images for the City of Toronto's StART program. Gonzalez-Ossa is originally from Talca, Chile, and is now based in Toronto.  

 

Cost
Free - Open to OCADU and AGO communities
Date
-
Venue & Address
Weston Family Learning Centre,
Art Gallery of Ontario
Toronto, ON
Type
Department
Image
ocadu
Keywords

In this free public talk, improvisational singer, avant-garde composer and novelist Tanya Tagaq discusses her bestselling first novel, Split Tooth. Please arrive early as space is limited to 250 seats.

Thursday, March 21, 2019

100 McCaul Street, Room 190

7:00pm - 8:30 pm

Doors Open: 6:30pm About Tanya Tagaq: Tanya Tagaq is an improvisational singer, avant-garde composer and bestselling novelist. A Member of the Order of Canada, Polaris Music Prize and JUNO Award winner, Giller Prize Long Listed author and recipient of multiple honourary doctorates, Tagaq is one of the country’s most original and celebrated artists. Tagaq’s improvisational approach lends itself to collaboration across genres and forms. Her work includes numerous guest vocal appearances (Buffy Sainte-Marie, Weaves, A Tribe Called Red, Fucked Up), original avant-garde classical compositions (Kronos Quartet, The Toronto Symphony Orchestra), commissions (National Maritime Museum in London, UK) and more. In its many forms, from novel Split Tooth to most recent album Retribution, Tanya Tagaq’s art challenges static ideas of genre and culture, and contends with themes of environmentalism, human rights and post-colonial issues. This event is produced with the support of the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, the Indigenous Visual Culture Program, the Creative Writing Program, and the Delaney Family Foundation.

Cost
FREE
Email
folas@ocadu.ca
Website
https://www.facebook.com/events/645064459285524/
Date
-
Venue & Address
100 McCaul St., Room 190
Type
Department
Image
Photo of artist Tanya Tagaq smiling warmly in colourful dress on a baby blue background
Keywords

HANDBOOK: Supporting Queer and Trans Students in Art and Design Education* 

HANDBOOK is a collaborative intervention in art and design pedagogy. It offers faculty a radical rethink on how to work with queer and transgender students on their path to becoming artists and designers – from the first day of school through to seminars, studio classes, and critiques. HANDBOOK draws directly from student experiences to help faculty of all orientations bring equitable teaching practices and queer curricula into art and design classes. Queer Publishing Project is a working group of over 100 students, alumni, staff and faculty at OCAD University and beyond who identify as queer and/or transgender.

Copies of HANDBOOK are available to Faculty and Staff at OCAD U through the Faculty offices (Faculty of Art, Faculty of Design, FOLASSIS and Grad Studies). Copies can also be accessed at the OCAD U Library, the Faculty Curriculum Development Centre, and the OCADFA office. 

Students can obtain copies at ODESI and OCADSU (Student Union); copies can also be accessed at the Centre for Emerging Artists and Designers.

*This 112-page publication, edited by Anthea Black and Shamina Chherawala, is produced in a limited edition of 1200 with a gatefold letterpress cover, printed by Nick Shick and Queer Publishing Project, on Vandercook Universal and No. 4 presses. HANDBOOK is designed by Cecilia Berkovic, with illustrations by Morgan Sea, and published by Queer Publishing Project and OCAD University Publications Program.

 

Faculty of Art
Image
images of pages from the handbook
Keywords
Date
-

The Global Experience Project (GEP 2018) Student Exhibition

gestures: life in the shadow of a volcano 

Monday, February 4 to Saturday, February 16, 2019 

Ada Slaight Student Gallery OCAD University 100 McCaul Street, Level 2

*New Exhibition Opening Date:  Monday, February 11, 6:30 p.m.

The works in gestures were created by student artists in the Jack Weinbaum Family Foundation Global Experience Project (GEP), an expansive initiative by the Faculty of Art designed to explore and build Canada’s prominence in global communities of art and culture.

In Fall 2018, nine OCAD U students undertook a studio seminar course based on the practice of international artist and activist Maria Thereza Alves, taught by Professor Min Sook Lee. In October, Alves visited our campus to engage with the OCAD U community in a series of workshops, seminars, lectures and studio experiences. During the holiday season, in December, Alves hosted OCAD U students at her home and studio in Naples, Italy. The Naples experience included visits to museums, archives, established and independent galleries, art academies, artist studios, artisan workshops, and churches where important artifacts are kept.

gestures: life in the shadow of a volcano is a multi-disciplinary exhibition, in which the GEP 2018 fellows unpack their experiences working alongside artist Maria Thereza Alves in both Toronto and Naples. 

Artists: Taymah Armatrading, Michelle Cieloszczyk, Steph Cloutier, Kasra Goodarnezhad, Holly Jo, Lily Yunru Lu, Angela McIntosh, Star Nahwegahbo, Colin Rosati 

Curated by Chiedza Pasipanodya

Date
-
Venue & Address
Ada Slaight Student Gallery
OCAD University
100 McCaul Street, Level 2
Toronto, ON
Type
Department
Image
Image of an artwork skulls on a shelf
Poster
gestures: life in the shadow of a volcano text on ombre background
Keywords

Encounter personal perspectives on the exile, dispossession, and internment of Japanese Canadians during the 1940s through a series of artworks interspersed throughout the Sigmund Samuel Gallery of Canada. This installation features contemporary artists who experienced this history first hand, and those who grapple with their parents and grandparents’ experiences. Being Japanese Canadian prompts us to reflect on the long-lasting ramifications of this historical Canadian injustice, and what it means to be Canadian today.

Exhibition Highlights

Being Japanese Canadian artists include:

Lillian Michiko Blakey is a third generation Japanese Canadian, based in Newmarket, whose family came to Ontario in 1952. The first in her family to graduate from university, she became a teacher, educational consultant, and professional artist. She is the past President of the Ontario Society of Artists, with paintings in the collections of the Government of Ontario and the Nikkei National Museum in Burnaby, BC.

David L. Hayashida is Sansei, a third-generation Canadian living in Kings Point, Newfoundland and Labrador. He is a ceramic artist who works with his partner, Linda G. Yates. Their inspiration is drawn from a wide range of interests – Newfoundland history, climate change, whales, and geology. Recently David has begun exploring the personal impact of his family’s Japanese Canadian history.

Emma Nishimura uses diverse media to address ideas of memory and loss rooted within family stories and inherited narratives. Her work includes traditional etchings, archival pigment prints, drawings, and installations. Found in public and private collections, these have been exhibited nationally and internationally. Based in Toronto, Emma teaches at the University of Guelph and OCAD University.

Steven Nunoda is a multidisciplinary artist based in Calgary, Alberta. His practice centres on extended research projects dealing with questions of material-as-metaphor, family life, culture and place, memory and identity. His sculpture and installation work incorporate miniatures, woodcarvings, constructions, digital imaging and output, text, and time-based strategies.

Laura Shintani is a multimedia artist based in Toronto, who believes the viewpoint of the audience is key.  She is interested in seeing people embrace the cycle of creativity – playing, problem solving, and reflecting. She hopes her audiences might be inspired to artistic expression and make a difference. No topic is taboo. Shintani encourages others to follow ideas that garner goodwill.  

Norman Takeuchi has very early memories of the interior of British Columbia, where his parents were forced to relocate from Vancouver during World War II. A graduate of the Vancouver School of Art, Takeuchi went to London, England in 1967, to concentrate on painting with support from the Canada Council. He left an exhibition design career in 1996 to focus on art. Takeuchi lives in Ottawa, Ontario.

Marjene Matsunaga Turnbull is a second-third generation Japanese Canadian, Nisei-Sansei. Well aware of prejudice while growing up, Turnbull focuses on the anger and hurt of racism in her sculptures. Turnbull tries to resolve cultural conflict within and without Japanese Canadian society in her work – to present ethnic, social, historical, and political commentary. Turnbull lives in Onoway, Alberta. 

Yvonne Wakabayashi spent her early childhood in an internment camp with her family in the interior of British Columbia. Returning to post-war Vancouver, she earned a Master’s degree in Education and spent many years as a textile teacher while developing her art practice. Wakabayashi’s work blends ancient Japanese cultural traditions with modern ideas. Wakabayashi lives in Burnaby, British Columbia. 

 

Website
https://www.rom.on.ca/en/exhibitions-galleries/exhibitions/being-japanese-canadian
Date
-
Venue & Address
Level 1, Sigmund Samuel Gallery of Canada,
Royal Ontario Museum,
Toronto, ON
Type
Department
Image
photo on cloth rolled into a ball
Document
News Release_Being Japanese Canadian opens at the ROM on Feb 2_Jan 16.pdf
Keywords

Pagination

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