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Held every year on March 21, World Poetry Day celebrates one of humanity’s most treasured forms of cultural and creative expression.  The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) first adopted the dedicated day in 1999 with the aim of supporting linguistic diversity.

In honour of World Poetry Day, some of OCAD U’s top creative writers have shared the poems that continue to inspire their own writing.  

The cover of the book alphabet.Associate Professor Catherine Black is the Chair of OCAD U’s Creative Writing program, which she helped to develop. Her writing practice includes prose poetry and other hybrid forms such as lyric essays and experimental fiction. Professor Black’s work interrogates the construction of memory, the intersections of imagination and reality, motherhood and artistic practice, and the dissociative aspects of grief, trauma and addiction. In 2019, her book of prose, Bewilderness was published by Guernica Editions. 

Recommendation 
alphabet (1981) by Inger Christensen  

A lament, a warning, an ode to the planet, alphabet is a long, sectioned poem underpinned by the Fibonacci sequence, also known as the Golden Ratio. The text emerges slowly as an elegy, a veiled forewarning of nuclear threat and climate catastrophe, but it unfurls as a nearly ecstatic chronicling of the beauty of the natural world. The scope of this poem is astonishing. It flits from macro to micro in a single stanza or a single line and speaks so directly to this moment in time.

The cover of Bless the Daughter

Lecturer in the Faculty of Arts & Science Ian Keteku is a poet, musician and journalist. Born in Calgary and raised by parents from Ghana, Keteku’s work follows the lineage of ancient African storytellers by paying homage to the past by revisiting lessons from previous generations. Keteku is a devout practitioner of Afrofuturism, a philosophy that projects the Black experience into a celestial, technological future. 

Recommendation 
Bless the Daughter Raised by a Voice in Her Head: Poems (2022) by Warsan Shire 

Warsan Shire is a celebrated Somali-British poet who is known for her collaboration with singer-songwriter Beyoncé on the album, Lemonade and the musical film Black Is King. Shire’s latest book of poetry Bless the Daughter Raised by a Voice in Her Head foregrounds themes of migration, womanhood, trauma and resilience. The poetry collection is inspired by the writer’s life as well as popular culture and news headlines.  
Cover of the book Black Markets

Interim Vice-President, Research & Innovation and Dean of Graduate Studies, Dr. Ashok Mathur is a South Asian (Indo-Canadian) cultural organizer, writer and visual artist. Dr. Mathur is the author of a volume of poetic prose titled, Loveruage; a dance in three parts (1994), a long poem titled The First White Black Man (2017) as well as three novels. A long-time advocate of critical race theory as it pertains to the postsecondary institution, he works continuously to address radical forms of equity and Indigenous knowledge in his creative and professional practices. 

Recommendation 
Black Markets, White Boyfriends, and Other Acts of Elision (1991) by Ian Iqbal Rashid  
The Heat Yesterday (1995) by Ian Iqbal Rashid  

Ian Iqbal Rashid is an eclectic writer who works in poetry as well as television. His poetry books, Black Markets, White Boyfriends, and Other Acts of Elision and The Heat Yesterday, are both wonderful examples of lives lived in the contexts of racialization and sexual identity, mediated by realities of class and urban living. Most recently, he has been critically acclaimed for his role on the writing team for the HBO serial Sort Of, demonstrating his versatility and range of writing. Rashid began his career in Toronto as an arts journalist, critic, curator and events programmer, particularly focused on South Asian diasporic, Muslim and LGBTQ2S+ cultural work.  

Rashid will be featured in an event this spring presented by SiteLines, a partnership between the Faculty of Art and the Office of Research & Innovation at OCAD University and the Canada Council for the Arts. The initiative promotes and supports the creative work of BIPOC artists and writers.

The cover of How She Read

Phoebe Wang is a Writing and Learning Consultant for English Language Learners for OCAD University’s Writing & Learning Centre. She is also a first-generation Chinese-Canadian writer who is currently the Writer in Residence at the University of New Brunswick. Her debut collection of poetry, Admission Requirements (2017) was shortlisted for the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award, the Pat Lowther Memorial Award and nominated for the Trillium Book Award. Her most recent poetry collection Waking Occupations will be released later this month by Penguin Random House Canada.  

Recommendation 
How She Read: Poems (2019) by Chantal Gibson 

Chantal Gibson’s debut book of poetry, How She Read is a collection of textured and innovative writing that Wang recommends to any reader who feels limited or outraged by the violence rendered upon racialized bodies. Drawing from grade-school vocabulary spellers, literature, history, art and popular culture, this publications shows the insidious longevity of imperialist ideas and the ways in which they are embedded in everyday things including storybooks, coloured pencils, paintings and postage stamps. Gibson, who is based in Vancouver, is also a practicing visual artist. Her poetry brings in acts of mark-making and redaction. How She Read shows how acts of critique and resistance can be so creatively abundant. 

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OCAD U’s creative writers recommend their top poetry picks.
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Eco-poetics call for applications banner

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: 
Ready to raise your voice to fight for climate justice?
Join Eco Poetics, a new radical student collective using spoken word to create a sustainable world.
Together, we will create individual and collective spoken-word based projects to imagine sustainable futures and create the world we want to see.


We are looking to bring together students with a range of experiences, and those with little to no experience with spoken word are encouraged to apply.

Students participating in this program will be granted an honorarium.
The time commitment is estimated to be 10 hours for the overall duration of this program

This program is supported by the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Sustainability Initiatives (ODESI) and the Creative Writing program.

Please fill out the application form below, including any accommodations you may need.

APPLICATION LINK: https://forms.gle/R7xPCA4BJLg12U5f6

If you have any questions, please reach out to Student Monitors Mia and Chloe:
mehnaz.lamia@ocadu.ca 
chloe.lederman@ocadu.ca

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mehnaz.lamia@ocadu.ca chloe.lederman@ocadu.ca
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Ready to raise your voice to fight for climate justice?

Join Eco Poetics, a new radical student collective using spoken word to create a sustainable world.


 

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Eco-poetics climate justice collective - Apply by Feb 28
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Image: A photo of the late Professor Morris Wolfe captured by his daughter Jennifer Wolfe and edited by his son Ben Wolfe.  
 

OCAD U pays tribute to beloved professor Morris Wolfe

The OCAD University community is celebrating the life of beloved professor Morris Wolfe, who taught at OCA, which later became OCAD U, for 30 years (1971-2001) and was known for supporting students throughout all stages of their creative careers.  

Wolfe, who chose a medically assisted death on November 27, 2021, was a prolific cultural critic, writer and editor. His legacy lives on in the hearts of the many students and colleagues he impacted throughout his life as an educator.  

“Morris Wolfe changed the lives of so many students over his time teaching global film studies at OCAD U. First a teacher, then a mentor, he often supported them well beyond their years at the University,” reflects Dr. Caroline Langill, Vice-President, Academic and Provost.  “He helped so many find their voices as creative scholars. His deep sense of empathy coupled with a commitment to social justice affected all of those who studied with him.” 

Judith Doyle, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Art reflects on her time studying with Wolfe in the 1980s: “Morris transformed me with his confidence. Film studies went by jurisdictions of the new, then - New York Avant-Garde, French New Wave, Brazilian Cinema Novo, Italian Neo-Realism. Morris taught these with a rattling 16mm projector on a cart, his erudition tempered by the aplomb of a podcast host. His courses were so popular that students sneaked in the back to watch." 

 
About Morris Wolfe  

Born to working-class Jewish-Polish immigrant parents in 1938, Wolfe began his career as a freelance writer, composing stories on loose pieces of yellow legal paper.  

He published numerous texts in his lifetime, including monographs, essays, columns and book reviews in magazines and newspapers across Canada. His inquisitive nature brought him to reflect on topics as far ranging as Sesame Street to the Vietnam War.  

He edited the landmark collection, The Spice Box: An Anthology of Jewish Canadian Writing in 1981. One of the first books of its kind published in the country, its texts contain reflections from each author on being Jewish in Canada. 

“His support of the book, in all its forms, led him to a lifetime of focused and caring writing, which included a portrait of his daughter Menya’s palliative journey after a devastating bout with cancer,” notes Langill.  

Wolfe wrote the moving account of his daughter’s death from breast cancer in Menya: An End of Life Story in 2003. Menya was named after Wolfe's maternal grandmother, who died in Auschwitz.  

In a review of the book in The Globe and MailCome From Away author and journalist who did research for Wolfe, David Macfarlane, writes of his incredible kindness, advice and support when he was an emerging writer and calls the book both “moving” and “lovely”.  

In his 2002 book, OCA, 1967-1972: Five Turbulent Years, Wolfe recounts the events surrounding the hiring of former OCA President Roy Ascott, his controversial 10-month tenure and subsequent departure. 

“He took on what we now refer to as the Ascott years, bravely chronicling what was a notoriously transformative time for the institution. As OCAD U was permanently changed by that time so were those of us who were lucky enough to study under Morris Wolfe,” says Langill. 
 

Remembering Morris Wolfe 

“He was simply the most influential teacher in my life. Through him I discovered world cinema and that I had something to say. Morris imparted an ethic of intellectual curiosity, social justice and kindness. He was indeed a mensch,” reflects Faculty of Art Professor Emeritus Richard Fung. 

“I am thankful for the mentorship Morris provided me when I was a student. For challenging me, intellectually and politically. For encouraging me to take on the essay form and for being such an amazing presence at OCA when so many of us needed his critical perspectives. He was a caring teacher and I was significantly fortified to have had his support at that time,” reminisces Faculty of Art Professor b.h. Yael. 
 
“Morris was a tremendous friend to me. I was introduced to him at OCA in 1999 when I was going through a difficult period. He showed me incredible kindness and I am grateful forever to him. We developed a friendship. Morris would share his work with me. He was a beautiful and sensitive writer. We shared the same birthday. For the last twenty years we would get together on our birthday and get shawarma, talk movies, books and baseball. Morris was an excellent human being and I will miss him greatly,” shares former student, Matt Bahen. 

“Morris thought and taught across the disciplines long before the University embraced this principle. He invited students and faculty from across campus to explore with him what new media was becoming at OCA,” remembers Faculty of Art Professor Michèle White.   

"I recall him in rooms with every surface piled with books, magazines and papers. In a sunken chair by a footstool where the readings piled highest of all, Morris delved into slow, solitary work - marking, annotating the archives, or building the transformative coursework of social change. A fire burned dangerously nearby,” Doyle recounts. 

Thank you to Professor Michèle White for her support in writing this tribute and to all those who shared their memories of Professor Morris Wolfe. 

Sources:    
The Toronto Star
Grubstreet Books
“Cruelties of fate and a legacy of kindness” by David Macfarlane (2003), The Globe and Mail 

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Wolfe was a faculty member and mentor at the University for 30 years.
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The Arts and Science digital publication editorial Committee- composed of Ross Bullen, Ian Keteku, Michelle Miller, Kathy Kiloh, Maria Belén Ordóñez, and Suzanne Stein  - are thrilled and so pleased to announce the second Issue of the Arts and Science Review, Writing Upside Down Worlds. This Issue contains a collection of fourteen student papers, selected from faculty nominations of best student writing from the 2020-21 academic year.  

We applaud the students whose papers were selected. It was a delight to team up with students to edit their excellent essays and collaborate on the website over the summer months. One goal of this publication is for continued collaboration between students and faculty so that the website becomes a unique public showcase of Arts and Science at OCAD University. This website is a platform to highlight the writing, resilience, and creativity of students- and the faculty who support them.

Thank you to Nicole Vella, web designer and Digital Futures undergraduate student who continues to work closely with both IT and The Review Committee on this digital publication. We are also grateful for the funding received from the Faculty of Arts and Science, which made it possible to award Greta Hamilton with a cash prize for their essay, “Black Hauntology in Claudia Rankine’s Citizen: An American Lyric”. Faculty funds also continue to assist in maintaining the website. A special thanks to this year’s faculty Committee who generously volunteered their time over the summer months.

We are sure you’ll enjoy the second Issue!  Stay tuned for the next essay submission call at the end of Fall and Winter Terms. The Committee for this publication is formed at the end of April. All nominations from the Fall and Winter term are reviewed once a Committee and process have been established. We encourage you to share The Arts and Science Review  as widely as possible !    
 
https://artsandsciencereview.ocadu.ca/
 
Sincerely,
 
Maria Belén Ordóñez
 
Ross Bullen
Ian Keteku
Kathy Kiloh
Michelle Miller
Suzanne Stein

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The Arts and Science digital publication editorial Committee are thrilled and so pleased to announce the second Issue of the Arts and Science Review, Writing Upside Down Worlds.
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Canadian poet Lillian Allen, the “godmother of dub,” has been chosen as VIU's 2020-21 Gustafson Distinguished Poet.

Reading/Performance and Q&A:
Wednesday, February 10, 2021 10 a.m. Pacific / 1 p.m. Eastern

Gustafson Lecture:
Thursday, February 11, 2021 5 p.m. Pacific / 8 p.m. Eastern

Register and the link to the event will be sent to your email address.

Allen’s talk will discuss the history and practice of dub poetry (& spoken word) as it speaks to resistance, resilience, transcendence and revolution. “Dub poetry & spoken word calls for embodied poetics that go beyond the page,” says Allen. “It says art matters; poetry is consequential and must be implicated in the ecology of human obligation to each other, to all living things, and in transforming self and the world.”

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Online
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Allen’s talk will discuss the history and practice of dub poetry (& spoken word) as it speaks to resistance, resilience, transcendence and revolution.

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The Mighty Pen Student Initiative Fund
Application Information Session

Join us on Thursday, November 19, 2020 from 3pm-5pm EST for a drop-in information session about the Student Initiative Fund application process. 

Information Session: Thursday, November 19, 2020, 4pm-5:30pm (EST)
Join the information session on Teams

Deadline To Submit Application: Tuesday, December 1, 2020, 12pm (EST)
Submit Applications To: wlc@ocadu.ca 

Are you a BIPOC student, collective or group? Do you have an idea for an online or virtual project that strengthens relations between communities and that responds to ongoing racism during the global COVID-19 pandemic?

Apply for the Mighty Pen Student Initiative Fund to help finance any online initiative that features students who identify as Black, Indigenous or People of Colour. The project can use any textual or visual media to generate stories, artwork and dialogue around social justice and anti-racist practices. Projects that are inclusive of a diverse range of identities and experiences are particularly encouraged this year.
 

Application Process 

Fill out the application form below with details of your project, timeline and budget.
Download the PDF application form here.
 

Adjudication Criteria

Your application will be juried by a committee of OCAD U staff from the Centre for Emerging Artists and Designers (CEAD), Indigenous Student Centre (ISC) and Writing & Learning Centre (WLC), who will evaluate your proposal on the following criteria: 

  • Relevance and Impact 
  • How does this project further you and your group’s creative and professional development? 
  • Does your project fit the mandate and vision of The Mighty Pen? 
  • Does your project impact OCAD U students and reach the wider community? 
  • How does your project address discrimination and racism during COVID-19, strengthen relations between communities, and feature BIPOC voices, experiences and stories? 
  • Equity and Inclusivity 
  • Does your project and group support social justice, equitable practices and include all members as active participants? 
  • Is your project inclusive of a diverse range of backgrounds and experiences? 
  • Feasibility and Accessibility 
  • What is your experience doing similar events and are you collaborating with other individuals, student and/or community groups?  
  • What is your timeline and can your project be delivered in the time proposed? 
  • Is your budget feasible? Have you located other sources of funding and/or revenue? 
  • Is your project accessible to a wide range of audiences with different needs? 
About The Mighty Pen 

The Mighty Pen amplifies the stories and experiences of racialized and underrepresented writers and creators. Facilitated by Phoebe Wang in the Writing & Learning Centre, this year The Mighty Pen invites guest writers and artists who self-identify as BIPOC to share their unique gifts with the OCAD University community through workshops and public events. The Mighty Pen Speaker Series is presented by the Writing & Learning Centre (WLC). It has been made possible by funding from the Ontario Post-Secondary Access and Inclusion Program (OPAIP). Learn more about the Mighty Pen here.

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FREE
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wlc@ocadu.ca
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Join us for this information session and ask any questions you have about the application process for the Mighty Pen Student Initiative Fund.

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The Mighty Pen Student Initiative Information Session
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The Mighty Pen speaker series welcomes poet and novelist Noor Naga for an online reading!

Date: Thursday, November 12, 2020
Time: 4pm-5:30
Where: Zoom
Free and Open to the Public 

Across a sea and an ocean, from a port city to a shoreline, Noor Naga shares her transcontinental and transformative work. Please join us for this online reading and conversation.  

About Noor Naga 
Noor Naga was born in Philadelphia, raised in Dubai, studied in Toronto and now lives in Alexandria. She is the winner of the 2017 Bronwen Wallace Award, the 2019 Disquiet Fiction Prize and the 2019 Graywolf Press Africa Prize. Her collection of poetry, Washes, Prays was with McClelland & Stewart published in 2020 and her debut novel American Girl and Boy from Shobrakheit is forthcoming from Greywolf Press in 2022! 

About The Mighty Pen 
The Mighty Pen amplifies the stories and experiences of racialized and underrepresented writers and creators. Facilitated by Phoebe Wang in the Writing & Learning Centre, this year The Mighty Pen invites guest writers and artists who self-identify as BIPOC to share their unique gifts with the OCAD University community through workshops and public events. 

The Mighty Pen Speaker Series is presented by the Writing & Learning Centre (WLC). It has been made possible by funding from the Ontario Post-Secondary Access and Inclusion Program (OPAIP). 

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Zoom
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ell@ocadu.ca
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The Mighty Pen Speaker Series welcomes novelist and poet Noor Naga for an online reading.

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The Mighty Pen Speaker Series welcomes
Janice Jo Lee, spoken word poet & singer

Date:
Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Time:
Q&A and Screening, 5:30pm-7pm

You are invited to the latest instalment of the Mighty Pen Speaker Series. This edition includes a BIPOC student-focused workshop on artistic vision followed by a Q&A with Janice Jo Lee, performances by student poets and an online screening of Lee’s docu-musical, The Legend of Sing Hey.

Q&A and Online Film Screening | 5:30pm-7pm | Zoom
In the docu-musical The Legend of Sing Hey, poet, musician and educator Janice Jo Lee embarks from Southwestern Ontario on a tour and road trip thatconnects her with artists, activists, friends and community members who inspire with their art-making and experiences of resilience. Her ancestor songs may inspire your own journeys!

View the film here.
Join the event on Zoom here.

Also part of this series...
BIPOC Student Workshop | 4pm-5pm | Teams
Developing Artistic Vision, Led by Janice Jo Lee
Join us for a creative development workshop for BIPOC students focused on the topic of artistic vision where we will ask: What is my purpose as an artist? and How can I make time and space for art in the rest of my life realistically? Together, with facilitator Janice Jo Lee, we will move through our self-judgement and ego. You will leave with a draft of your artist statement.

Register here.
Join the workshop via Teams here.

About Janice Jo Lee
Janice Jo Lee is a folk-soul singer-songwriter, spoken word poet, actor and playwright of Korean ancestry, from Kitchener, Ontario. As a hard femme queer radical she is interested in using art to build communities based in justice and joy.

About The Mighty Pen   
The Mighty Pen amplifies the stories and experiences of racialized and underrepresented writers and creators. Facilitated by Phoebe Wang in the Writing & Learning Centre, this year The Mighty Pen invites guest writers and artists who self-identify as BIPOC to share their unique gifts with the OCAD University community through workshops and public events. The Mighty Pen Speaker Series is presented by the Writing & Learning Centre (WLC). It has been made possible by funding from the Ontario Post-Secondary Access and Inclusion Program (OPAIP).

Learn more about the Mighty Pen here.

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Free
Email
ell@ocadu.ca
Website
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Bronwen Wallace Memorial Award-winning poet SONNET L’ABBE returns with her third collection in which a mixed-race woman decomposes her inheritance of Shakespeare by breaking open the sonnet and inventing an entirely new poetic form. Join us for the Toronto launch of Sonnet’s Shakespeare with special guest readers.

This reading and book launch is supported by the OCAD University Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, the OCAD University Creative Writing Program, the League of Canadian Poets, and Penguin Random House Canada.

Books sold by A Different Booklist.

This is a free public event in a fully accessible venue.

Cost
FREE
Email
folas@ocadu.ca
Website
https://www.penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/564193/sonnets-shakespeare-by-sonnet-labbe/9780771073090
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OCAD University, 100 McCaul St., Room 270, The Great Hall
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Spoken Word Performance & Writing Activity with Taqralik Partridge
Saturday, September 21, 2019
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.

Co-presented with Wapatah: Centre for Indigenous Visual Knowledge

Onsite Gallery
199 Richmond St. West

Free event as part of Onsite Gallery's public event program for ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras.


Join Inuk artist, writer, curator, throatsinger, spoken word poet and Onsite Gallery exhibiting artist, Taqralik Partridge, for a spoken word performance and writing activity.

The title of Onsite Gallery’s exhibition, ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras, is taken from the poem ‘My Home Is in My Heart’ by famed Sámi writer Nils-Aslak Valkeapää. During this event, Taqralik will perform one of her spoken word pieces and then guide attendees in a writing activity inspired by a shared theme.

Everyone is welcome—whether you consider yourself a poet or simply a lover of written or spoken word, join us as we experiment with text and language.

 

Taqralik Partridge is an Inuk artist, writer, curator, throatsinger, and spoken word poet. She is originally from Kuujjuaq in Nunavik, although she now splits her time between Canada and Kautokeino in northern Sápmi. Partridge’s writing focuses on both life in the north and on the experiences of Inuit living in the south. Partridge co-founded the Tusarniq festival held in Montreal. Her performance work has been featured on CBC radio one and she has toured with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. Partridge has also worked as Director of Communications for the Avataq Cultural Institute. In 2010, her short story Igloolik won first prize in the Quebec Writing Competition and the same year she was a featured artist onstage at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver. In 2018, Partridge was named as a finalist for the CBC Short Story Prize. Partridge is Editor-at-Large for the Inuit Art Quarterly. Her work will be featured as an official selection at the Sydney Biennale in Sydney, Australia in 2020.

 

ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ
Among All These Tundras

September 18 to December 7, 2019

ᐊᓯᓐᓇᔭᖅ
asinnajaq
ᓛᑯᓗᒃ ᐅᐃᓕᐊᒻᓴᓐ ᐸᑦᑑᕆ
Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory
ᑲᕈᓚ ᑯᕋᕼᐊᓐ
Carola Grahn
ᒫᔾᔭ ᕼᐋᓕᓐᑐ ᐅᓇᓗ ᓵᒥ ᕕᓐᓚᓐᒥᐅᑕᖅ
Marja Helander
ᖃᑉᓗᓯᐊᖅ
Kablusiak
ᓵᓐᔭ ᑲᓕᕼᐅ-ᑰᒻᔅ
Sonya Kelliher-Combs
ᔪᐊᖅ ᓇᓐᑰ
Joar Nango
ᑕᕐᕋᓕᒃ ᐹᑐᔨ
Taqralik Partridge
ᐱᐅᓕ ᐸᑐ
Barry Pottle
ᐃᓅᑎᖅ ᓯᑐᐊᑦᔅ
Inuuteq Storch
ᑲᔨᓐ ᐸᓐ ᕼᐅᕕᓕᓐ
Couzyn van Heuvelen
ᐊᓕᓴᓐ ᐊᑰᑦᓲᒃ ᒍᐊᑕᓐ
Allison Akootchook Warden

ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᑲᒪᔨᑦ: Hᐃᑐ ᐃᒡᓗᓕᐅᖅᑎ, ᐋᐃᒥ ᐳᕈᑎ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓴᕆᓴ ᐹᓐ ᕼᐃᐅᓕᒐ
Curated by Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa

ᓴᕿᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᔪᖅ ᑖᒃᑯᓇᖓᑦ ᓕᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐲᓇ ᐊᓕᓐ ᓴᓇᖕᖑᐊᖅᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᒃ, ᑳᓐᑯᑎᐊ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᒃᔪᐊᖅ
Produced and circulated by the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University

Among All These Tundras, a title taken from the poem ‘My Home Is in My Heart’ by famed Sámi writer Nils-Aslak Valkeapää, features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world. Together, their works politically and poetically express current Arctic concerns towards land, language, sovereignty and resurgence. Click here to read more.

Produced and circulated by: Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Patron Sponsor: Birch Hill Equity Partners
Supported by: Canada Council for the Arts, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage), Initiative for Indigenous Futures and Nexus Investments

Onsite Gallery is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. Visit our website for upcoming public events. The gallery is located at 199 Richmond St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 0H4. Telephone: 416-977-6000, ext. 265. Opening hours are: Wednesdays to Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m. Free admission.

Onsite Gallery acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes; with gallery furniture by Nienkämper. Onsite Gallery logo by Dean Martin Design.

 



The Wapatah Centre for Indigenous Visual Knowledge is a hub for facilitating the documentation, communication and translation of Indigenous ways of seeing. Drawing on the inseparable concepts of perception and knowing, Wapatah assists Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists and researchers to collaborate on the presentation and representation of artistic knowledge. Wapatah promotes Indigenous research at multiple scales, from Indigenous-led research at OCADU to creating connections and partnerships at the global level.

 

Image: Taqralik Partridge, Tusarsauvungaa, 2018 - . Series of nine elements. Cotton, polyester, wool, silk, glass beads, metal beads, Canadian sealskin, reindeer leather, reindeer antler, thermal emergency blanket, plastic packaging, cardboard, Pixee lures, plastic tarp, Canadian coins, laundry tokens, United Kingdom coin, tamarack tree cones, dental floss, artificial sinew, goose feather and river grass. Installation view (detail), Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University, 2018. Photo: Paul Litherland/Studio Lux.

Cost
Free
Email
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone
416-977-6000 x456
Website
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/spoken-word-performance-writing-activity-with-taqralik-patridge-tickets-68812051699
Date
Venue & Address
Onsite Gallery: 199 Richmond St. West
Type
Department
Image
ocadu
Poster
Taqralik Partridge, Tusarsauvungaa, 2018 -
Keywords

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