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Remembering Dr. Claude Gidman, designer of Toronto’s iconic streetcars

The OCAD University community is celebrating the life of industrial designer Dr. Claude Gidman, who passed away on April 21, 2022 at the age of 87.  

Dr. Gidman, who retired from his role as a faculty member and Chair of the Industrial Design program in 2000, had a collaborative spirit and dedication that influenced generations of creators and consumers. 
 
Known for his work in product and transportation development, he designed one of Toronto’s most recognizable icons, the classic Red Rocket streetcar for the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC).  

The development process began in 1974 and resulted in the Canadian Light Rail Vehicle (CLRV), which entered the public transit system in 1979. The final design, including the seat positions and signature bright colours, continue to inform the TTC designs that have proceeded it.  
 
“There’s a certain romantic aspect to what a streetcar should be,” he once said. “The question was whether you want the streetcar to blend in with the city or stand out. We decided it should stand out.” 

The legendary public transit vehicle is woven into the fabric of the city and can even be spotted in Disney Pixar’s latest animated film Turning Red, which is set in early-2000s Toronto.
 

More about Dr. Claude Gidman 

Born in Claresholm, Alberta in 1934, Dr. Gidman started out as a radio news reporter after graduating high school in the small farming town.  

He went on to attend the The Art Center School (now called ArtCenter) in California with a Ford scholarship and, while living in Los Angeles, worked at the Canadian Consulate. After graduation, he moved to the United Kingdom and worked for Ford of Britain, contributing to the style, design and ergonomics of commercial vehicles and automobiles.  

He returned to Canada and contributed to the coordination of several Expo 67 exhibitions that were part of the Canadian Federal Pavillion, including the Man and the Community and the Atlantic Provinces displays. After the event, which was held in Montreal in 1967, Dr. Gidman went on to found Gidman Design Associates as Design Director (GDA), which had offices in Calgary, Montreal and Mississauga.  

“Claude had a light touch, but this was always underpinned by his deep values. Though he took the stage in many venues, he was most comfortable in one-on-one free-ranging discussions, or enjoying the annual ritual of playing basketball with his graduating class of students,” reflects Sheila Waite-Chuah, former associate professor in the Faculty of Design at OCAD U. 
 
A versatile designer, Dr. Gidman developed products ranging from snowmobiles and Brita water filter carafes to construction machinery, amusement park rides and garbage cans for McDonald’s restaurants.  

“It doesn’t matter whether you’re designing heavy equipment or ski boots,” Dr. Gidman proposed in an April 2000 article published by Transit Toronto. “The design process is a process. It should start with a team of people from many different disciplines - engineering, marketing, design and so on.”  

His most impactful concept, aside from the streetcar, was perhaps the Orion II low-floor bus, developed in the 1980s specifically to support public transit travel for people with physical disabilities. This kneeling bus design continues to be used across Canada. 

In 1987, Dr. Gidman became the first industrial designer to win a Toronto Arts Award. The following year his work was featured in the exhibition, Art in Everyday Life, at Toronto’s Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery. 

He held the position of Chair in the Industrial Design and Fine Arts departments at OCAD U and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the institution in 2008. Dr. Gidman’s departure from OCAD U was accompanied by an exhibition of his design work at 100 McCaul Street’s atrium which included drawings, paintings, models and photographs documenting a career that spanned almost six decades. 

“Claude played a key role in shaping the Industrial Design program [at OCAD U], through student selection, curriculum development and faculty hiring,” noted then Dean of the Faculty of Design Lenore Richards at Dr. Gidman’s retirement in 2000. 

He developed and directed the Creative Design Research Unit (CDRU), partnering with the Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University) and the University of Toronto, where he also taught product design. 

“Daily, Claude carried several leather bags with him to match his several hats – always full of drawing markers and renderings, headlight lenses, nuts and bolts and bits of clay stuck to his shoes,” remembers Barbara Parkinson, who joined GDA in 1983 as the Office Administrator and continues to have a strong relationship with the Gidman family.   

“In any given day he could have worked on a mockup in his studio, taught several classes at OCAD U, spent time with the fourth year University of Toronto Mechanical Engineering students at CDRU, returned for client meetings in Mississauga at GDA before heading to a church meeting in the evening,” she comments. 

“He poured his ingenuity, understanding, inspiration, compassion, acceptance, kindness, professionalism, and creativity into everyone in his life as well as his brilliant inventions. The world is a much less creative place with Claude not here.” 

Photo:  
Courtesy of the family. 
 
Sources:   
Maclean’s 
OCAD University 
Transit Toronto 

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News Summary
The Chair of the Industrial Design program until 2000, Dr. Gidman promoted collaboration across disciplines.
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A portrait of Claude Gidman wearing glasses leaning his face on this hand.
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Image: Detail from The Sanix Hub by Industrial Design undergraduate student, Julien Benghozi. 

Designing the future of health care

Industrial Design students at OCAD University envision the future of health care in the virtual exhibition, Designing for Futures of Well-being, on view until January 30 as part of DesignTO 2022.

Organized by Faculty of Design Instructors Nadine Hare and Renn Scott along with Faculty of Design Associate Professor Ranee Lee, the exhibition showcases prototypes created in the fall by students enrolled in human-centred design (HCD) and design for health undergraduate courses. 

For the exhibition, the group of emerging designers leveraged human-centred design methods to re-envision everyday products in two key areas: aging and personal protective equipment (PPE). 

“Applying human-centered design methods produces more caring solutions for underserved populations as well as those who are typically forgotten in the design process (for example, older adults living with dementia),” notes Nadine Hare, who, in addition to being an instructor at the University is an Innovation Fellow at Women’s College Health Institute for Health System Solutions and Virtual Care in Toronto. 

Human-centred design thinking, also referred to as user-centred design, is a philosophy that empowers an individual or team to design products, services, systems or experiences that address the core needs of those who experience a problem. 

“When imagining the future, we not only think about what people want and need, but also what they are using and have access to now. In some cases, we need to change people's expectations about what is possible. By testing and reiterating concept ideas we can understand if the opportunities we've identified are worthwhile,” says Instructor Renn Scott, who also runs a design consultancy firm called Daily Goods Design LABS. 

To create their prototypes, the students researched the needs of their target users. Then, they sketched solutions and developed low-fidelity versions of their designs. These were presented to end users and subject matter experts. Integrating their feedback, the students produced their final concepts.  
 
“In order to design truly relevant and impactful solutions, designers must begin with an empathetic and holistic understanding of the people they are designing for,” explains Ranee Lee.

In addition to the online exhibition, viewers are invited to visit a window exhibition at All Ours Studio located at 62 Geary Ave. in Toronto, which showcases the prototypes digitally.

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Designing for Dignity in Aging 

Featuring the work of Fife Ashley, Sahar Athari Nikounejad, Connor Dudgeon, Kevin Ernst, Sabbrina Hassan Ortiz, Victor Josic, Kai Mackenzie, Anas Mehta, Mariana Mejia, Esteban Poblona, Henry Rudman, Shoji Ushiyama, Cheuk Wing Yu and Catherine Xayabanha. 
 
Together with Baycrest Health Sciences, OCAD U students imagined what purpose, connection, choice and autonomy could look like for older adults living with Alzheimer's. This component of the exhibition explores what health means to older adults themselves and asks, “how might older adults living with dementia continue to engage in the activities that make them feel fulfilled?” and "how might clinical-looking assistive products be re-designed to foreground dignity and comfort?”. Rooted in a deep understanding of the daily experience of aging, the featured designers developed a series of products that can support older adults in finding physical, emotional and social well-being. 

The works in the exhibition include: 

Smoothie Snacks for Older Adults by Cheuk Wing Yu and Catherine Xayabanha is an appealing, nutritious, care-giver friendly snack to keep older adults with dementia healthy. 

& Tableware by Connor Dudgeon, Shoji Ushiyama and Victor Josic destigmatizes tableware for adults with dementia that uses colour theory and styling from high-end tableware to encourage food consumption and create a meaningful eating experience.  

Family Oriented Mindfulness App by Fife Ashley, Esteban Poblona and Henry Rudman is a group-based and cognitive-centric digital application that integrates mindful practices in everyday household tasks. 

Sensory Self Care Kit by Sabbrina Hassan Ortiz, Anas Mehta and Mariana Mejia is a grooming kit inspired by vintage wares that helps reconnect women with dementia to grooming memories while boosting their self-esteem.  

Hugging Hearts Vest by Sahar Athari Nikounejad, Kevin Ernst and Kai Mackenzie is a caretaker identification tag to support smoother communication between residents in long-term care and their caregivers. 

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Imagining the future of personal protective equipment (PPE) 

Featuring the work of Sabrina Barona-Reinoso, Julien Benghozi, Ryan Carney, Katya Koroscil, Erin MacGregor, Samira Nassiri and Parna Rashidkhani. 
 
This exhibition examines how innovative designs that integrate antiviral and antibacterial materials and emerging technologies can be used to help protect us. Representing yet unseen scenarios, we see how casually worn masks, shields and accessories represent optimism, while technology that supports how we interact with others helps communicate a message of caution. The prototypes shown in this exhibition propose personal protective equipment for the not-so-distant future.  

The works in the exhibition include: 

Purified Bubble Pod by Sabrina Barona-Reinoso is a transparent bubble and portable environment that provides up to five people with a safe space filled with natural sunlight that they cannot get when isolating indoors. Equipped with a ventilation system, which creates a form of sanitization, the whole dome can be disinfected after it detects that there are no people inside. 

The Sanix Hub by Julien Benghozi includes the Sanix Cabinet for fast access, easy disposal and the disinfection of medical masks. The Hart Mask is sanitized and charged within the cabinet, which helps keep healthcare workers safe while also increasing their ability to communicate and do their work effectively.

Re-inventing Remote Learning by Ryan Carney purposefully uses emerging technologies to enhance human abilities and perceptions. Its intention is to make sure that those who face learning, language, financial, geographical, self-discovery and mobility barriers experience their education with as few limitations as possible. 

Hoodi by Katya Koroscil is a wearable, which includes a mask with a medical insert, an adjustable neck warmer and hood, all of which connect using recycled magnets. Its modular design eases clothing transitions and outfit changes within the flow of a day, as the magnets allow for simple and varying points of connection. Like the city we live in, we are always moving, Hoodi will keep us warm, healthy and protected along the way.  

The Raincoat by Erin MacGregor allows users to communicate through the use of panels of innovative e-textile ChroMorphus fabric and haptic sensors in the cheeks of the face covering. With just a push of a button on their smartphone users can send friends a kiss on the cheek or turn red like a chameleon to say, “Please! Just leave me alone!”. The face covering can also be buttoned up or down for the wearer’s comfort. 

Creative Covid Mask by Samira Nassiri is inspired by beekeeping face shields and is designed to motivate young people to maintain their physical distance. Its multi-layered design means it can expand horizontally. It has multiple purposes including the ability to carry many objects by hand when the wearer doesn’t need or want to carry them on their back. 

Grip N’ Roll by Samira Nassiri and Parna Rashidkhani is an accessory that helps people feel safe when they take transit. Washable and reusable, the rectangular shaped accessory can be snapped onto any type of bar and serves as a way for a commuter to hold onto, but not touch, public transit bars and handles.

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News Summary
Industrial Design students use human-centred design to develop prototypes of devices for well-being.
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A digital rendering of a prototype for mask sanitization.
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Image: Susan Blight, Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture is photographed by OCAD U lecturer Kristy Boyce wearing faculty member, Jason Baerg's latest designs. 
 

Faculty member Jason Baerg launches new fashion collection

What would it look like if fashion cycles were aligned with the lunar calendar? In his new fall collection, Pawahikayhk, fashion designer, artist and Indigenous faculty member at OCAD U, Jason Baerg does just that. 

Pawahikayhk celebrates the fall equinox, with a combination of electric colours, bold patterns and flowing horsehair. The collection’s name means harvest in Michif, the language of the Métis people, a community of which Baerg is a member. 

Baerg is the artistic director of the fashion label ᐊᔨᒪ/Ayimach, which in Cree means a fortunate change of events leading toward success. He started sketching fashion designs as a teenager, growing up in  in Saskatchewan and released his first collection last year.  

“For this collection I was thinking about fall, reflecting on the harvest and the tones associated with it. Movement is also at the core of this work. COVID-19 masks continue to be integrated into my fashion designs as a reflection of our current realities,” explains Baerg. His apparel, which is available via the brand's website, honours the seasons and the colours associated with traditional teachings. 

Pawahikayhk is a capsule collection, a condensed assemblage of garments that acts as a snapshot of the designer’s vision. Pieces from a capsule collection often share a colour scheme or theme and are meant to be mixed and matched. Pawahikayhk was developed very much in that spirit.  

In a recent photoshoot capturing the collection, Baerg brought models from the Indigenous community together with OCAD U Digital Futures graduate and lecturer, Kristy Boyce, in the role of photographer.  

Susan Blight, Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture was featured in the shoot, wearing an aqua coloured, cinched waist mini-dress with earrings by Indi City, a contemporary Indigenous accessories brand founded by Angel Aubichon, whose family is Peepeekisis Cree.  

Rhéanne Chartrand, a Métis creative producer and graduate of OCAD University was also featured, wearing an olive and camel coloured short sleeve mini-dress in silk with gathered details around the shoulders and a loose turtleneck, which doubles as a face mask. Chartrand is currently the curator of Indigenous Art at McMaster Museum of Art.  

Recently, Dr. Dori Tunstall, Dean of OCAD U’s Faculty of Design, was seen on Instagram sporting Baerg’s two tone cotton romper in blue and red from his 2021 spring collection, Mwachii Lunn (Half Moon).  

ᐊᔨᒪ/Ayimach has gained attention from ELLE Fashion Magazine as well as from former FashionTelevision host Jeanne Beker, who received an Honorary Doctorate from OCAD U in 2018.  

Baerg’s 2020 collection, ᓀᔭᐤ/Neyaw, was celebrated at Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto, an annual event that showcases fashion, textiles and craft by Indigenous artists, that foregrounds the intersection of mainstream fashion, Indigenous art and traditional practices. Neyaw is Cree for a point of land jutting onto the water. Also a capsule collection, ᓀᔭᐤ/Neyaw celebrated Indigenous Futurities, combining metallic materials, upbeat colours, traditional customs and aspirational visions of transformation. 
 
In addition to launching his new fall fashion line, Baerg’s work is featured in the solo exhibition, Tawâskweyâw ᑕᐋᐧᐢᑫᐧᔮᐤ A Path or Gap Among the Trees, presented by Canada Gallery, housed in the High Commission of Canada in London, UK. The catalogue for this touring retrospective includes essays written by OCAD U’s Ryan Rice, Curator, Indigenous Art for Onsite Gallery; Dr. Gerald McMaster, Canada Research Chair (Tier I) of Indigenous Visual Culture and Curatorial Practice and professor in the Faculty of Art; and Stephen Foster, Dean of the Faculty of Art. The publication is available at Art Metropole
 
You can check out more of Baerg’s work at the city’s annual international art fair, Art Toronto 2021. His laser-cut paintings will be featured by Vancouver-based, Fazakas Gallery in one of the fair’s eight project spaces. 

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Keywords
News Summary
The collection, Pawahikayhk, honours the seasons and colours associated with traditional Cree teachings.
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Photo of Susan Blight by Kristy Boyce
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Accompanying Onsite Gallery's current exhibition, Survival Architecture and the Art of Resilience, this online panel moderated by Michael Piper of the University of Toronto's John H. Daniels Faculty will present and discuss practices of collaboration, creation, and community research that aim to address systemic issues of oppression, with speakers including artist Cindy Blažević (Toronto, ON); Jessica Kirk, Wildseed Centre for Art & Activism (Toronto, ON); Rowan Lynch, Hearth (Toronto, ON); and Derrick Meeking, Empowerment Plan (Detroit, MI). Presented in partnership with John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto.

Online event; Zoom link will be sent to registered attendees. Click here to register.

ASL interpretation provided.

Moderator:

Michael Piper is an Assistant Professor of urban design and architecture and director of the Master of Urban Design program at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto. His research and teaching focus on the relationship between design, equity, and political-economic contexts with particular attention on the social and formal transformation of North American suburbs. He is a co-founder of tuf lab, a research group that brings together urban design and urban planning faculty at U of T. He is also a founding partner of dub studios, a design studio with offices in Toronto and Los Angeles where he manages urban design projects. Current projects and coursework focus creating multi-family housing in North American single-family suburbs and cultural spaces of citizens underrepresented in mainstream design and planning. He is a co-coordinator of Engage-Design-Build, a research and outreach program in partnership with the Toronto District School Board that connects with underrepresented youth about their communities and the design lead for Toronto Housing Works exhibition. Michael is from Atlanta and has also lived in Alaska, Abu Dhabi, New York, Los Angeles, Croatia, Paris, Columbus, OH, and Boston.

Speakers:

Cindy Blažević is a visual artist whose research-based practice uses photography, performance and multimedia to investigate identity, belonging and systems of power and exclusion. Deeply invested in activism and social engagement, she has spent years exploring Canada’s penal system, immigration policies and constructions of citizenship, often through collaborative processes with diverse communities. Through both documentary and fiction, she critiques the systems within which she operates. Her work has been exhibited and awarded internationally. Blažević was the inaugural Artist in Residence at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Toronto. She currently lives in Toronto with her three rambunctious kids and her partner, Pascal. You can see her work at cindyblazevic.com.

Jessica Kirk is a cultural worker, curator and community organizer based in Toronto. She is the Executive Director of Wildseed Centre for Art & Activism, a project of Black Lives Matter Canada that serves as fertile ground for Black creativity and organizing in the city. She holds an M.A. in Social Justice Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, and her thesis was written on Black geographies and critical creative practice within and beyond the city.

Founded in 2019 as an artist-run space, Hearth seeks to provide a site to present projects within a context that values collaboration, experimentation, and community. As a structural element in the makeup of a house, and a tool providing warmth, light, and food; a hearth gathers us towards itself, and towards each other. Hearth is located on Ulster St. just east of Three Star Variety (621 Bathurst, Toronto, ON, M5S 2R2). See hearthgarage.com or @hearth.garage for information on past and present programming.

Derrick Meeking is native Detroiter with a professional background in nonprofit management, workforce development, local economic development, and social enterprise business models. His experience spans over 12 years which creates a unique professional profile rooted in a desire to improve the quality of life for historically disenfranchised people and marginalized communities through education, research, grassroots activism, and the promotion of innovative community economic development solutions. Derrick currently serves as the Director of Workforce and Programs at the Empowerment Plan, where their mission is to “End generational homelessness through employment”. He holds a Bachelor's of Arts in Political Science from the University of Michigan and is currently pursuing a Master of Science in Nonprofit Administration from Louisiana State University.

Date
-
Venue & Address
Online event
Cost
Free
Email
egove@ocadu.ca
Website
Type
Department
Keywords
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Humanizing Our Communities with Art and Design
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Welcome To BLACK GradEx 2021

Enjoy short podcast-style video conversations with graduating OCADU students.

Assistant Professors Michael Lee Poy & Kestin Cornwall sit down with their guests Sydney Gittens, Natia Lemay, Ehiko Odeh, Kayla Wallace,  Kaylee Meyer, Adé Abegunde.  They discuss OCAD U, art, and what inspires their work and how OCAD U and their community can assist them moving forward. You will enjoy the discussions, we promise. 

View at your convenience any time after June 1st, 2021
Available at blackocadu.ca & on Youtube

Black OCADU
blackocadu.ca/black-gradex

Black OCADU Youtube Page
youtube.com/channel/UClTk4QUJIDZgXfS88i7kMLg

Date
-
Venue & Address
View at your convenience any time after June 1st, 2021
Available at blackocadu.ca & on Youtube
Cost
FREE
Email
bydi@ocadu.ca
Phone
416.977.6000
Website
Type
Digital Screen
Keywords

Welcome To BLACK GradEx 2021!  Enjoy short podcast-style video conversations with graduating OCADU students.

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Welcome To BLACK GradEx 2021
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​Every year the OCAD U Zine Fair brings together an amazing collection of talent and innovation in alternative publications. Join us on Thursday March 12th and Friday March 13th, from 11:30am-6:30pm, to meet our wonderful vendors, be inspired and buy their hand crafted work!

Each day will feature a different group of vendors representing a broad range of making: zines, comics, poetry, independent magazines, prints, stickers and so much more. The Zine Library will be hosting button making throughout the event. All proceeds from button making will go to the OCAD Zine Library collection and its initiatives. Visit http://ocad.libguides.com/zinelibrary to learn more about the OCAD U Zine Library and stop by https://library.artstor.org/#/collection/87731595;browseType=undefined to browse the catalogue for our collection! 


Thursday vendors:

Sid Sharp   www.sidsharp.com

Vincy Lim   www.vincylim.ca

Emily Fay Fin   www.fayforest.com

Inky Laundry www.instagram.com/melanieyl www.instagram.com/h_yunsun

Lina Wu www.instagram.com/linaw_u

Cleopatria   www.cleopatria.ca

Laur Flom   www.instagram.com/softqweer 

agnes-wong   www.instagram.com/agnesdoubleu

Christine Kos   https://christinekosart.wixsite.com/portfolio

Samya Moineaud   www.instagram.com/samyamoineaud

The Coven Collective   www.instagram.com/caroscoven

Supafly: The Guardian   www.instagram.com/iamsupafly

Eric Glennie   www.instagram.com/softspotmagazine

Norah Galea   https://norahgalea.myportfolio.com

Olivia Mae Sinclair   www.instagram.com/OliviaMaeSinclair

Grace Brooks   www.instagram.com/malibu_barbara

natalie 麥月明  www.instagram.com/panfryegg

Chris/MakerMeyao   www.instagram.com/makermeyao

 

Friday vendors:

madcrush.co   www.madcrush.co

Miapear   www.instagram.com/miapear

Andre Freitas   https://www.facebook.com/ozman.hq

Casey Helm – VESTAIS   www.instagram.com/vestais

shiverspooky  https://shiverspooky.wixsite.com/shiverspooky-arts

Rain / rainnstorms   https://rainstorms.squarespace.com

Clara Lynas   www.instagram.com/claralynas

Haley Kenyon   www.instagram.com/BrokenTelevision

Alyssa Bernardo   www.bernardo-alyssa.format.com

Mish Smallwood   www.instagram.com/mishsmam

Inbal Newman   www.inbalnewman.com

Rey Tabandeh   www.instagram.com/reyd.art

Bàn Bạn Bán   www.instagram.com/connieele  www.instagram.com/mo.rita  www.instagram.com/kev_pham

Weird Garbage   www.weirdgarbage.ca

Lunchroom Toronto   www.instagram.com/lunchroomtoronto

Cold Strawberries Collective (CSC)   www.coldstrawberriescollective.com

Ryookyung Kim   www.instagram.com/sideofkimchi

Small Sword Press   www.instagram.com/smallswordpress


Poster by miapear (https://www.instagram.com/miapear/)

Date
-
Venue & Address
Lobby of 100 McCaul Street
Cost
Free
Email
mchudolinska@ocadu.ca
Website
Type
Digital Screen
Department
Keywords
Join us on Thursday March 12th and Friday March 13th, from 11:30am-6:30pm, to meet our wonderful vendors, be inspired and buy their hand crafted work!
Banner Image
OCAD Zine Fair 2020
Event Display
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Join Sculpture & Installation student Nabeela Malik for a hands-on workshop exploring the potential of geometry in art and design!

This workshop is designed for students to learn 2D geometry based from Islamic geometric art. Nabeela will begin the workshop with a brief presentation on the artistic and mathematical aspects of geometry and how geometry can be implemented in art and design. Nabeela will demonstrate methods and techniques, starting with a circle as the starting point for creating other shapes with multiple sides accurately, and then help students to copy the designs to learn by example. Participants will then move into overlaying more shapes to expand and create increasingly complex compositions. The goal of this workshop is for each student to have learned and practiced new geometric skills and create a design that they could use in their practice.

Visit www.nmcustomart.com to check out Nabeela's portfolio!

Student-Led workshops are funded by the Ontario Post-Secondary Access and Inclusion Program (OPAIP) administered by the Writing & Learning Centre. These workshops are free, including materials, and are open to all current students.

Date
-
Venue & Address
Learning Zone, 113 McCaul Street, Level 1. Also accessible from 122 St. Patrick Street.
Cost
Free
Email
mchudolinska@ocadu.ca
Website
Type
Digital Screen
Department
Keywords
Join Sculpture & Installation student Nabeela Malik for a hands-on workshop exploring the potential of geometry in art and design!
Banner Image
Geometry in Art and Design Workshop
Event Display
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Sha is the COO and a co-founder of Nava, a public benefit corporation formed during efforts to help fix HealthCare.gov. Nava partners with government agencies to improve critical public services, and now works across several projects in the US on programs including Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Affairs, and SNAP. Pairing a strong service design and user research centered approach with rigorous experience in building scalable and resilient public infrastructure, Nava has helped tens of millions of people enroll in and manage their benefits, streamlined processes to save decades of labour years, and saved government agencies hundreds of millions of dollars.

An architect by training and an entrepreneur by accident, previous to co-founding Nava Sha worked for clients including the New York Times, Harvard's Library Lab, CNN, Flickr, and Adobe. A frequent speaker, Sha has spoken at events and institutions around the world including the Eyeo Festival, Webstock, The Conference, Visualized, and the White House Datapalooza.

The event is co-presented by the Digital Futures Graduate Program at OCADU and Civic Hall Toronto

Please contact Josh Paglione (jpaglione@ocadu.ca) if you require any accomodations.

Thanks to our community partners:

 

 

Cost
Free
Email
jpaglione@ocadu.ca
Website
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/sha-hwang-in-conversation-tickets-63380217938
Date
-
Venue & Address
100 McCaul St. Room 190
Type
Department
Image
Sha Hwang
Keywords

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