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OCAD University’s Faculty of Art in partnership with the Toronto Reel Asian Film Festival presents: The Kym Pruesse Speaker Series:

Art Creates Change - 
Featuring : Deann Borshay Liem

Crossings

Deann Borshay Liem, a Sundance Institute fellow, has worked in independent documentaries for over twenty years. Her films include the Emmy Award-nominated documentary, First Person Plural (Sundance, 2000) and the award-winning films, In the Matter of Cha Jung Hee (PBS, 2010) and Memory of Forgotten War (with Ramsay Liem; PBS, 2015). As former director of the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM) she activated the work of racialized artists in public media.

Join us for the Canadian premiere of Liem’s film CROSSINGS, a documentary that follows a group of international women peacemakers who set out on a risky journey across the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea, calling for an end to a 70-year war that has divided the Korean peninsula and its people.

Following the screening Deann Borshay Liem will be in conversation with Christine Ahn of Women Cross DMZ.

 

--- ​​​​​​Deann Borshay Liem Director Bio ---

Deann Borshay Liem has over 20 years’ experience working in the development, production, and distribution of independent documentaries. She is the producer, director, and writer of the Emmy Award-nominated documentary, First Person Plural (2000), as well as the award-winning films In the Matter of Cha Jung Hee (2010) and Memory of Forgotten War (2015).

Program presented in collaboration with Reel Asian Film Festival

Event co-sponsors:

Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific StudiesKorean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York UniversityCentre for the Study of Korea at the University of TorontoAsian Canadian Women’s AllianceKorean Professional Womens’ Association

Date
-
Venue & Address
OCADU Auditorium
Rm 190, 100 McCaul St
Cost
Free
Website
Type
Department
Keywords
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https://acwa.ca/OCAD University’s Faculty of Art in partnership with the Toronto Reel Asian Film Festival presents: The Kym Pruesse Speaker Series:

Art Creates Change - 
Featuring: Deann Borshay Liem

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Cathy Daley: Undiscovered: A Memorial Survey

October 20–November 26, 2022
Opening reception Thursday, October 20 from 6 to 8 pm

Birch Contemporary 
129 Tecumseth St, Toronto M6J2H2

Image Credits: Cathy Daley Untitled (stack), 2011, 25" × 85", acrylic and collage on canvas SOLD: BMO, collection

Date
-
Venue & Address
Birch Contemporary
129 Tecumseth St, Toronto M6J2H2
Cost
Free
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

Cathy Daley: Undiscovered: A Memorial Survey

October 20–November 26, 2022
Opening reception Thursday, October 20 from 6 to 8 pm

 

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Cathy Daley: Undiscovered: A Memorial Survey
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Ginette Legaré’s solo exhibition, SUPPLY CHAINS, will take place at BIRCH CONTEMPORARY East gallery, from October 20 to November 26, 2022, with an opening reception on Thursday, October 20th, from 6 to 8 p.m. BIRCH CONTEMPORARY is located at 129 Tecumseth Street, Toronto, and gallery hours are from Thursday to Saturday, from 11 a.m to 6 p.m.

SUPPLY CHAINS

Ginette Legaré’s latest body of work consists of sculptures and large scale installations drawn from reclaimed metal and wire objects. These redeployed and reconfigured fragments, now linked up beyond their expired functions, re-member lived material exchanges. As such exchanges tentatively inhabit the everchanging vocabulary of discards, they silently suggest the “chains” of longings, pasts, and futures inscribed at the core of our dependence on replaceable goods and networks.

The artist acknowledges the generous support from the Ontario Arts Council.

Date
-
Venue & Address
129 Tecumseth Street, Toronto
M6J 2H2
Cost
Free
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

Ginette Legaré’s solo exhibition, SUPPLY CHAINS, will take place at BIRCH CONTEMPORARY East gallery, from October 20 to November 26, 2022, with an opening reception on Thursday, October 20th, from 6 to 8 p.m. BIRCH CONTEMPORARY is located at 129 Tecumseth Street, Toronto, and gallery hours are from Thursday to Saturday, from 11 a.m to 6 p.m.

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The OCAD U FoA is partnering with the Council for Canadian American Relations (CCAR) to extend the life of the “Art With A Conscience: A Conversation” program.  

There is a free and open to the public Livestream at the Great Hall and OCAD U Live, while the real-life talk will be held in MoMA NY. 

Time: Tuesday, Oct 25, 10 AM to 11:45 AM @The Great Hall / OCAD U Live / MoMA NY  

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The program will then be available on CCAR's website and social media via CCAR's YouTube channel. Directors of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. will speak in dialogue and moderate a panel of artists and stakeholders in discussions that explore current and relevant issues in the arts:  

  • Where Are We?   
  • What are our Responsibilities?   
  • Where do we go from here?   

The goal is to generate a robust discussion that engages stakeholders from diverse communities: artists, arts leaders, etc., about the challenges and opportunities that can affect best practices.   

  • Kaywin Feldman  Director of National Gallery of Art Washington D.C. 

  • Sasha Suda George D. Widener  Director and CEO of the Philadelphia Museum of Art 

  • Dawoud Bey  Artist from Chicago, IL 

  • Darren Walker  President of Ford Foundation New York, NY 

  • Lisa Hageman Yahgulanaas  Artist from Haida Gwaii, British Columbia 

OCAD U and CCAR kindly ask for your feedback after participating. A survey will follow after the viewing party.  

If there are specific topics you would like to be included in the conversation. Please email: madgeyao@ocadu.ca by Friday noon. OCAD U will hand it to the panellist for their consideration. 

 

Date
-
Venue & Address
Viewing Party: The Great Hall (100 McCaul St, 2F)
Online: OCAD U Live
In person: MoMA NY
Cost
Free
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

The OCAD U FoA is partnering with the Council for Canadian American Relations (CCAR) to extend the life of the “Art With A Conscience: A Conversation” program.  

There is a free and open to the public Livestream at the Great Hall and OCAD U Live, while the real-life talk will be held in MoMA NY. 

Time: Tuesday, Oct 25, 10 AM to 11:45 AM @The Great Hall / OCAD U Live / MoMA NY  

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Diane Pugen LIFE IN ART 

Faculty Artist talk 
Tuesday, November 15th, 6:30 pm
Room 230 
Second Floor 100 McCaul 
DRPT Faculty Retirement Reception to Follow 

--- Diane Pugen Biography ---

Diane Pugen is a prolific artist whose long career has included multiple roles within the arts community. Through a socio-cultural and political lens, her works examine her own and society’s relationships with the lands they inhabit. She began exhibiting her work in 1965 with exhibitions locally and across Canada, receiving many Canada Council and Ontario Arts Council awards for her studio practice. She has exhibited internationally in various locations, including Havana, Cuba, Mexico City, Mexico, Santiago, Chile, Berlin, Germany, and the United States. Pugen was educated at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Art Students' League of New York. 

Additionally, she has contributed to the arts and culture community through her important curatorial work organizing impactful shows such as Inaugural Exhibition, A National Survey of Contemporary Women Artists, at Toronto’s Pauline McGibbon Women’s Cultural Centre, Bonnie Devine: Stories from the Shield, for the Woodlands Cultural Centre and Art Gallery of Algoma. Most notably, she curated ‘Hokusai Revisited, featuring the work of Nobuo Kubota, which garnered him a Governor-General Award for Visual art in 2009. 

Throughout her career, she has worked tirelessly as an activist for artists' rights through her advocacy work on various boards in the culture sector. Pugen served on the board of the Toronto Arts Council, where she helped to develop the committee structure for their adjudication of community arts grants. While in this role, she was also a key organizer in initiating individual artists' grants and establishing Artscape, the city’s space agency. While on the board at CARFAC,  she helped develop the seminal book “Information for Artists” and worked on the passage and implementation of the new copyright law and the TAC exhibition rights, which guarantees that artists must be paid fees for public exhibitions. Additionally, her valued board contributions at The Association for Native Development in the Performing and Visual Arts included curating, lobbying, and promoting opportunities for Indigenous artists at The Centre for Indigenous Theatre. These immense efforts resulted in her receiving The City of Toronto Medal of Honour for Service to the Non-profit Cultural Sector in 1992

In addition to her artistic and advocacy work, Pugen is an Associate professor in the Faculty of Art at OCAD University, where she has taught for 31 years. She has contributed to service on integral committees across the university in such roles as co-chairing the First Year program with Nobuo Kubota, sitting on University Senate, CICOF, and as a faculty advisor with Robert Houle to the OCA First Nations Group and the Provost’s Task Force on Indigenization. Her pedagogical expertise includes printmaking, figure drawing and landscape in both drawing and painting. She has contributed significantly to the decolonizing efforts across the university, working to develop courses on the land and the relationship to the human body and by bringing in esteemed guest speakers and elders from Indigenous communities to inform the coursework.  

Most recently, Pugen was profiled as one of the featured artists in a new 2018 publication, At Home Talks with Canadian Artists, by Lezli Rubin-Kunda. In 2019 Diane Pugen was invited to write the forward to the new book From Bear Rock Mountain by Antoine Mountain, a Dene painter and writer.

Date
-
Venue & Address
100 McCaul St. Room 230
Cost
Free
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

Diane Pugen LIFE IN ART 

Faculty Artist talk 
Tuesday, November 15th, 6:30 pm
Room 230 
Second Floor 100 McCaul 
DRPT Faculty Retirement Reception to Follow 

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Two Films By Pierre Tremblay
Max in Space: 12 Conversations with the Artist Max Dean
Louise Bourgeois Doesn't Do Interviews Anymore

🗓️Friday, October 21st, 3-5 pm
📍Auditorium (MCA-190), 100 McCaul Street

Filmmaker Pierre Tremblay (Professor at Toronto Metropolitan University)and Artist Max Dean will be in attendance for a Q&A.

Summary of Louise Bourgeois(1911-2010)
Louise Bourgeois' life was a prolific demonstration of utilizing the creation of art as a tool for processing one's inner emotionality and psychological landscape. Working across a wide variety of mediums that included painting, drawing, and sculpture, her work dealt largely in dissecting, exploring, and reacting to the traumatic events from her own childhood that included her father's infidelity. Bourgeois' often brooding and sexually explicit subject matter and her presentation of the female viewpoint in regards to suppression, feminism, and sensuality alongside a distinct focus on three-dimensional form were rare for women artists at the time. Her single-minded devotion to expression, both as an artist and as a mentor to young artists, lent Bourgeois an international importance that remains vast, manifested most strongly through her influence on the development of conceptual and Installation Art.

 

Artist Bio - Max Dean
Max Dean was born in Leeds, England in 1949, and received a B.A. in art history from the University of British Columbia in 1971. Since then he has had a prolific career as a performance, video and installation artist, producing work that actively questions and explores the relationships between the artist, the spectator and the work of art. He has employed a diversity of materials from traditional drawing tools to cars, found objects, bathtubs, and television monitors as well as new technologies to explore issues pertaining to the psychological and metaphorical aspects of interactivity.

He has exhibited widely – both alone and in over twenty group exhibitions – beginning with Pacific Vibrations at the Vancouver Art Gallery in 1973 - and internationally – in England, Germany, and twice at the Venice Biennale in 1999 and in 2001 for The Table: Childhood now in the Gallery’s collection. He taught at the University of Ottawa (1979-88), and later at York University. From 1985-86, he was artist in residence at the National Museum of Science and Technology, Ottawa, and in 1996, he received the Jean Chalmers National Visual Arts Award.

 

Filmmaker Bio - Pierre Tremblay
Interdisciplinary artist, Pierre Tremblay is aProfessor at Toronto Metropolitan University, School of Image Arts. His artistic practice, combining new technologies and video, questions the world in flux, how we see and perceive. Recently completed is a film series on Michael Snow, David Rokeby and R. Bruce Elder as well as work on various new media projects: Continuum and Portraits in a sentence. Recent exhibitions of note include Dans la nuit des images, Grand Palais, Paris, and le Mois de la Photo 2009, Montreal, along with festival screenings in Canada, Italy, Australia, China and Brazil. His work can be found in France at Musée Carnavalet, Bibliothèque Nationale and the Musée Rodin. In his role at Ryerson, Tremblay has facilitated conferences and edited books that have brought scholars and artists from Ontario, Quebec and France together for cross-cultural exchange on a variety of new media topics.

Date
-
Venue & Address
Auditorium (MCA-190), 100 McCaul Street
Cost
Free Admission
Type
Department
Keywords
foa

Two Films By Pierre Tremblay
Max in Space: 12 Conversations with the Artist Max Dean
Louise Bourgeois Doesn't Do Interviews Anymore

🗓️Friday, October 21st, 3-5 pm
📍Auditorium (MCA-190), 100 McCaul Street

Filmmaker Pierre Tremblay (Professor at Toronto Metropolitan University)and Artist Max Dean will be in attendance for a Q&A.

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The recent regulated and confining pandemic years have operated to aggravate already existing anthropogenic anxieties. Climate change – oppressive unpredictable heat waves, uncontrolled forest fires, rising oceans levels – have had an impact on the race that both facilitated it and now roils from its effects. Aggressive urban sprawl bulldozes the land, and we search from among the rubble to find what of “land” remains. In Canada, the colonial project created divisiveness, poverty, and an early death for some, but also vast wealth and proprietorship for others. Can this unsettling situation be unraveled, or have we gone too far?

Date
-
Venue & Address
113Research, 113 McCaul Street, 5th Floor

OCAD University, Toronto.
Type
Department
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foa

Anthropogenic Anxiety

Exhibit opening September 22, 2022, running to Dec. 2023.
Pam Patterson & Sasha Shevchenko (OCADU), Joanna Black & Sarah Paradis (University of Manitoba)

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Midnight Mountain by Rob Nicholls

The enchanted forest is arguably one of the oldest motifs in storytelling. Forests are spaces where anything can happen, characters’ morality and bravery are tested, and adventures unfurl. From the ancient Epic of Gilgamesh, where the heroes travel to the Cedar Forest to battle monsters, to J.R.R. Tolkien’s magical and mysterious Mirkwood to the musical Into the Woods, in which fairy tale characters face peril while learning life lessons, the metaphoric possibilities of stories set within the woods remain a rich ground for artistic exploration.

The same is true in visual art history. Although painting a century and a continent apart, the forests found in works by Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732 – 1806) and Charles Burchfield (1893 – 1967) share an interest in the transcendental effect forests have upon the human psyche. Toronto-based Rob Nicholls cites both artists when discussing his own otherworldly paintings. “Fragonard’s landscapes are decadent, while Burchfield’s feel as if we’re stepping through a mystical portal, from one place into another,” he says. “The contrast between light and darkness animates their paintings and, with Fragonard especially, every form and shade of colour has been painstakingly thought out and orchestrated to slow down the viewing process.” Growing up on Vancouver Island, Nicholls says, was like “living in a fable,” with its surrounding water, mountains and giant fir and cedar trees. “That visual catalog is imprinted in my memory, as is Queen Elizabeth Park in Vancouver,” he says. “That park reminds me of a Fragonard painting, with caverns and hollows you could get lost in amongst the precisely planned abundant vegetation. I often think of it while I’m painting.” But, unlike a city park, Nicholls’s paintings are not completely pre-planned, though he is meticulous in his approach.

Nicholl’s prepares the painting surface with layers of gesso until, he says, it is as smooth as the hood of car. During this priming stage, he may develop ideas for a colour palette, and overall composition and mood, but he allows his paintings to progress intuitively. “It’s like puzzle pieces falling into place,” he says. “A cave here, a glimpse of a river through the foliage there, a waterfall, a volcanic pool… it’s rewarding to watch elements come together and to be surprised by the image as I’m making it.” Despite their flat surfaces, Nicholls’s paintings convey a sense of trompe l’oeil-like relief through exacting brushwork – he sees each stroke as ‘a ray of light’ – and a keen sense of perspective; their shimmering gem-like quality coming from the semi-transparent oil paint reflecting the light hitting the painted surface back at the viewer.

As well as painting, Nicholls composes subtly percolating ambient music in the vein of Steve Reich and Harold Budd under the name Provincial Parcs. Nicholls’ music is repetitively mediative (like his brushstrokes and painting process), so it’s surprising to learn about his youthful love of heavy metal. “I was a fan of the Much Music Power Hour back in the day,” he says. “The aesthetics of 1990s metal – album cover images of dark landscapes populated by fantastical plants and creatures – is another point of departure for my paintings.” Like a heavy metal song, Nicholls’s paintings lure us into a world where magic, mystery and menace await.

Essay by Bill Clarke - September 2022
Director Mark Zadorozny
mark@markchristophergallery.com

Date
-
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Mark Christopher Gallery
100 Symes Road
Cost
Free
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Midnight Mountain by Rob Nicholls

Opening: September 16, 7 pm to 10 pm
Friday, September 16 - Friday, September 30
Hours: Monday to Sunday from 11 am to 6 pm

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OCAD University is proud to announce the recipients of the 2021-22 Teaching Awards
 
Annually, the University celebrates outstanding faculty, instructors and teaching assistants who employ diverse, inclusive and evidence-informed methods to provide exceptional learning experiences for their students. This year, the winners are also applauded for demonstrating remarkable leadership in action. 
 
Nominations for the annual awards are accepted from the OCAD U community including students, staff, faculty and alums. The categories include institutional and faculty level recognition, as well as the School of Continuing Studies and Teaching Assistant awards.  
 
A committee composed of members from across the University, adjudicates the awards and is struck by the Office of the Vice-President, Academic and Provost with support from the Faculty & Curriculum Development Centre (FCDC). Read about the award winners below!
 

Institutional Level Teaching Awards
 
JJ Lee
Associate Professor, Faculty of Art 

Recipient of the Price Award for Leadership in Teaching, which is presented to tenured and tenure-track faculty in honour of JH and Mamie Price

A woman smiling with glasses

Since 1999 Professor Lee has shared her passion for art with students at OCAD U. Hailing from Halifax, Nova Scotia to parents who immigrated from China and Hong Kong, Lee explores the hyphens between identities that result from colonization, immigration and its subsequent generations in the classroom and studio. 

“I believe that art can initiate social change by impacting the way people see and think. I prioritize connection, caring and compassion, to create a sense of community and inclusion even across a digital divide,” Lee notes.  

Reconstructing the intersections of Chinese and Western cultures, she combines appropriated images from diverse sources to produce reinvented and hybrid identities in her own creative practice. Lee builds positive relationships with her students by connecting with their personal lived experiences and responding to their individual needs in a culturally sensitive way. 

“I view teaching as an integral part of my art practice. I believe that art making (my own or my students’) affects how we engage with the world around us. As a woman of colour, I hope that I can be a mentor and guide for our students who also identify this way,” Lee explains. 

Lee is lauded by students for her ability to create community even in remote teaching circumstances. She is praised for her authenticity, warmth and encouragement.  

“She taught us how to participate in critique and give feedback in a respectful, positive and constructive manner, which became a cornerstone of our learning experience. Throughout it all, she met us where we were and helped us elevate our expectations of ourselves despite pandemic challenges, leaving us believing “we can do this,” a former student describes. 
 

Dr. Adam Lauder
Instructor, Faculty of Arts & Science 

Recipient of the Non-Tenured Award for Leadership in Teaching, which is presented to sessional faculty, or faculty that are Teaching-Intensive Stream, Continuing or Contractually Limited Term Appointment (CLTA) 

A person with a short haircut
Since January 2017, Dr. Lauder has been celebrated by students at OCAD U for connecting art historical teachings to real-world activities by integrating in-person art viewing opportunities into his curriculum. He is generous in his reflections on student assignments and artworks while cultivating a student-centred, inclusive learning environment. He specializes in modern and contemporary as well as media art histories in courses that include Conceptual Art Practices and Canadian Art: The Modern Era. 

“I’m interested in rewriting familiar narratives and exposing marginalized stories and protagonists. I want to engage students in processes of careful reading and critical research-creation," Dr. Lauder says of his pedagogical approach. 

Students remark on his commitment to accessibility. Throughout the year he ensures all lectures are recorded and includes a transcript that support students in following along while viewing course material.  

“Dr. Lauder’s thorough and constructive feedback shows how much he cares about our academic success. He genuinely takes the time to share insightful comments on our projects, proposing additional theories or artists we could explore to further develop our contemporary art and art historical perspectives,” reflects a recent student. 

One of his recent undergraduate students notes, “Dr. Lauder skillfully bolsters student learning by balancing high expectations and extensive personal support. His lectures are well-organized and clearly articulated. By his own example he demonstrates how the use of elevated vocabulary and well-structured arguments can add nuance and depth to the understanding of critical art history." 
 

Faculty Level Teaching Awards

Meera Margaret Singh
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Art

Recipient of the Faculty of Art Teaching Award 
A photo of Meera Margaret Singh
Meera Margaret Singh began teaching at OCAD U in 2010 as a Sessional Instructor. Building on her formal training as a photographer, she teaches courses across faculties including International Art Collaborations (INTAC) in the Faculty of Art and Photo For Communication in the Faculty of Design. Students describe a particular fondness for her course Reconsidering Documentary Photography, which explores the ethical implications of documentary practices, consent and power dynamics. 

For Singh reciprocity, respect, wellness and care are central to learning.  

She describes her approach: “Creating a socially conscious classroom environment begins with an instructor who has an investment and a passion for diversity and equity, a well as a true passion for the subject matter that they teach. Students garner a far richer academic experience if they are confident in sharing their ideas and feel that they are active participants in an exchange of information.” 

Students celebrate Singh’s attention and responsiveness, making them feel counted and valued. Her approach in the classroom and commitment to mental health supports students’ general sense of wellbeing. “I want learners to know the power and possibilities of their unique voice and those of their peers. I aim to create a classroom of trust where students are comfortable asking questions and having open dialogue with their professor and peers,” she explains.  

“As a student with disabilities, there are various barriers faced in my pursuit of an undergraduate degree. Professor Singh has always made it a point to establish a learning environment that supports the individual needs of her students. Through her consistent communication, patience and accommodative practices, she never fails to ensure academic success for every student she meets,” notes a recent student. 
 

Bruce Hinds
Associate Professor, Faculty of Design

Recipient of the Faculty of Design Teaching Award 

A black and white photo of Bruce Hinds
For the last 20 years Professor Hinds has taught at OCAD University, contributing to the vision of several core courses. He served as Chair of the Environmental Design from 2010 to 2019, sharing his expertise and imbuing his values around sustainability into the program throughout his tenure. Today, Hinds teaches across undergraduate and graduate programs including thesis students in Environmental Design and graduate students in Design For Health.  

Hinds has built numerous partnerships with organizations and institutions to broaden engagement in his courses and provide meaningful, real-world experiences for students as they develop their unique design practices. Past partnerships include major organizations such as, Herman Miller, St. Joesph’s Health Centre, SickKids and Arizona State University. 

“Professor Hinds has been a positive influence in both my academic and professional career as an advisor, professor and friend. I truly admire his leadership and wish many more faculty members were as dedicated as he is to his students,” remarks a former student. 

Trained as an architect, Hinds has centralized sustainability in his practice for decades. After being inspired by the book Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature (1997) by Janine M. Benyus he introduced two courses on the topic at OCAD U, which continue to influence much of the Environmental Design undergraduate curriculum as well as the Design for Health graduate program. Many of the projects undertaken in the upper year courses of Environmental Design focus on issues of water, energy, food, transportation and regenerative architecture, and are united by a desire to re-establish the relationship between human needs in cities and the needs of nature. 
 

Dr. Dot Tuer
Professor, Faculty of Arts & Science

Recipient of the Faculty of Arts & Science Teaching Award 
A photo a person wearing a mask.

As a professor of visual culture for over 20 years, Dr. Tuer has advocated for and designed courses that reach beyond traditional art history to encompass global perspectives and decolonial art practices. She was central to the development of the Visual and Critical Studies undergraduate program as its Founding Chair, and has taught courses on Latin American art, modern and contemporary art theory; postcolonial theory and visual culture; art and revolution; the history of photography; and the history of new media art. Her Latin American courses were the first and until very recently the only art history courses on Latin America to be offered at a Canadian university.

Dr. Tuer describes her primary goal as an educator as, “providing students with cultural, social and historical frameworks for the making of and thinking about art and design that are decolonial, accessible and critically engaged with global and local contexts.” 

Dr. Tuer’s own writings on visual culture similarly engage with global and local contexts, ranging from the study of Canadian video, new media and performance art to Latin American photography and colonial history. Her current scholarly and creative work explores artistic practices of memorialization and visual storytelling in the Americas and incorporates her long-standing research interest in the decolonial agency of hybrid spiritual and ritual practices.

“Professor Tuer's welcoming energy and positive attitude towards teaching creates a rewarding learning environment. The passion for the topics Professor Tuer teaches encourages students, like myself, to become interested in art histories and curatorial styles beyond the Western canon that are rarely discussed in other spaces,” a recent OCAD U graduate notes. 

“Dr. Tuer’s wealth of knowledge on the art and history of Latin America apply decolonizing contexts and critical analysis of Canadian and European art by challenging grand narratives. Dr. Tuer's research in the field and life experiences are vital as a professor of art history. Dr. Tuer's storytelling abilities are unrivalled,” a student reflects. 

The author of Mining the Media Archive (2005) and numerous museum catalogue, book anthology and journal essays, Dr. Tuer also has an active curatorial practice. In 2012, she curated the major retrospective, Frida and Diego: Passion, Politics, and Painting at the Art Gallery of Ontario. 
 

Maya Mahgoub-Desai
Associate Professor, Faculty of Design
Chair, Environmental Design 

Recipient of the School of Graduate Studies Teaching Award 

A black and white photo of someone wearing a black shirt.

Professor Mahgoub-Desai is a researcher and practitioner whose research investigates themes related to human-environment behaviour, public health and public realm design, addressing equity in design education (with a focus on disability) and inclusive pedagogies. 

"I've been lucky to have Maya as my teacher, instructor and mentor. She encouraged my class to think outside the box and to view projects and ideas with an acute eye for detail, ethics, professionalism and profound honesty,” a mature student in the Design for Health graduate program notes. 

Mahgoub-Desai brings a range of professional design experiences to the classroom. As the Senior Urban Designer for Moriyama Teshima Architects, Mahgoub-Desai led urban campus, community and municipal plans that focused on sustainability, cultural resilience and collaborative community engagement processes. She shares with her students lessons learned from past projects, which include, serving as a subject matter expert for Waterfront Toronto, developing master plans for Qatar's Education City, Surrey City Development Corporation and the Town of Whitby; and campus plans for the University of Lethbridge, Wilfrid Laurier University and Conestoga College. 

“Associate Professor Mahgoub-Desai's mentorship has been essential to my career. Throughout my Major Research Project (MRP), she consistently inspired me to look further, to learn to unlearn, to be a better listener and to become a better designer. She challenged me to think purposefully and holistically about not only my academic work, but the influence of design overall,” reflects a recent graduate.  
 

Kalina Nedelcheva 
Teaching Assistant, Faculty of Arts & Science

Recipient of the Teaching Assistant Award, which is presented to a TA from any of the four faculties 
Photo of Kalina Nedelcheva

Kalina Nedelcheva joined the OCAD U community in September 2020 as a graduate student in the Art Criticism and Curatorial Practice. In February 2021 Nedelcheva began supporting students as a teaching assistant for the undergraduate course, Professional Practices. They have also TAed the core courses Contemporary Art & Design, as well as Global Visual & Material Culture: 1800 to Present. 

Nedelcheva is a multi-media artist, researcher, illustrator, curator and musician. In their medal-winning MFA thesis Nedelcheva explored the ways human consciousness engages in processes of meaning-making. With a passion for writing, film and experimental mapping as mediums for theoretical storytelling, they channel the potential of chaos and montage to challenge dominant ideological practices.  

Nedelcheva brings compassion to the classroom where they engage in knowledge-sharing and productive dialogue with others, facilitating critical and safe learning environments where knowledge can be expanded on and contested.  

“My teaching philosophy centres on an awareness of positionality, both my own and that of my students. While I approach education in an organized manner with optimism and humour, I also emphasize responsibility in teaching, learning and unlearning,” Nedelcheva remarks.  

Heather Gentleman
Instructor, School of Continuing Studies  

The School of Continuing Studies Teaching Award  
A photo of Heather Gentleman
Heather Gentleman is a painter whose work, which is inspired by literature, anthology and mythology, has appeared in exhibitions internationally. Her experience as a gallerist and internationally collected artist informs her classes, where she teaches drawing skills, watercolour painting, figurative painting, portraiture and drawing for seniors in the School of Continuing Studies. 

With training from OCAD University, the University of Guelph and Chelsea College of Arts and recent exhibitions in South Korean, England and France, Gentleman brings an international perspective to her art and teaching. 

“Decolonization not only underpins my approach to my art making but also my engagement with my students where I see the role of the instructor as mentor. I endeavour to create an environment where students feel heard and safe to express their individuality, are actively supported and encouraged both to explore possibilities and to realize the potential of their ideas, as artists, and as individuals,” Gentleman explains. 

“Heather was engaging, enthusiastic, adaptable, creative and dedicated. I loved her class and learned a lot. I am eager to take another class with her,” remarks a former student. 

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Annually, OCAD U recognizes educators who have made an incredible impact on their students.
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Arctic/Amazon

Networks of Global Indigeneity

LEAD CURATOR: GERALD MCMASTER
CO-CURATOR: NINA VINCENT
INSTITUTIONAL CURATOR: NOOR ALÉ, ASSOCIATE CURATOR

Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity explores the ways in which Indigenous contemporary artists ​and collaborators take on issues of climate change, globalized Indigeneity, and contact zones in and about the Arctic and the Amazon during a time of crisis. The featured artists have their origins or are connected to these places, and their works embody a politics of resistance, resurgence, and ways of knowing and being in relation to the lands that are the source of their knowledge and creativity.

Public Artist Talk: 🗓Thursday, Sep 15, 7 PM to 8:30 PM 📍100 McCaul St. Rm 544 👩‍🎨Artist: Olinda Reshijabe Silvano

Olinda Reshijabe Silvano’s vibrant mural features maze-like designs known as the ancestral Shibipo-Konibo art of kené. Across her work, Silvano references el Ronín, a divine anaconda who is the mother of the earth and water, and whose geometric patterns inspired kené art. Cosmovisions and creation stories are accompanied by icaros—healing and ritualistic songs—that materialize kené designs into creation. The abstracted linework represents the koshi force of plants—positive energy—that manifest as colourful lines perceptible to Shipibo-Konibo artists. Olinda Reshijabe Silvano (b. Paoyhan, Peru) is a Shipibo-Konibo artist whose woven embroidery textiles and public art feature bold geometric abstractions, known as kené designs. The kené is a network of meaning and complex relations guiding paths, healing, and creating connections between human and more-than-human beings in an animated environment. These maze-like patterns are sacred designs that emerge from singing and experiencing connections between worlds propitiated by shamanism that render the invisible perceptible. Silvano is a symbol of resistance in Cantagallo, Peru, where she relocated to continue the tradition of kené art along with the collective Las Madres Artesanas (the Artisan Mothers).

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100 McCaul St, Rm 544
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Free
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The Faculty of Art invites you to join a Public Artist Talk by Olinda Reshijabe Silvano on the behalf of "Arctic/Amazon Networks of Global Indigeneity" in partnership with OCADU and the Powerplant.
 
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