Skip to main content

Body

Please join us for the inaugural event Decolonising Futures Speaker Series, as a part of OCAD U's Strategic Foresight and Innovation BIPOC Speaker Series, featuring Monika Bielskyte and Prateeksha Singh. Strategic Foresight and Innovation Masters Program is launching a BIPOC Speaker Series to foreground the important and ground breaking work that has been taking place to challenge and question the primacy of dominant worldviews and practices.

Featuring:
Monika Bielskyte 
Founder, Protopia Futures

Prateeksha Singh
Equitable Futures
Researcher

In-person 6PM networking at 130 Queens Quay East, East Tower, Floor 4R, Toronto, ON M5A 3Y5

ASL translation provided, the Waterfront has fully accessible and gender inclusive washrooms. Masks required. 

Date
-
Venue & Address
Zoom, Eventbrite registration link in description
Cost
Free
Type
Department
Keywords

Decolonising Futures Speaker Series

Banner Image
Decolonizing Futures
Event Display
Show when event is over
Image
SFI BIPOC Speaker Series: Decolonising Futures Wednesday, June 15th 20225:30PM SFI VIP Class Reception Event 6:30PM Online and In-Person Talk starts International Speakers: Monika Bielskyte Founder, PROTOPIA FUTURES Prateeksha Singh Equitable Futures Researcher
Body

For more information please visit the Anna Leonowens Gallery website.

Presenters Bios
France Trépanier is a visual artist, curator and researcher. She is co-director of the Primary Colours/Couleurs primaires initiative, which uses decolonial methodologies to decentre the western arts lens and place Indigenous arts at the heart of the Canadian art system. Over the past two decades, France worked as an arts consultant with a wide range of cultural institutions and arts organisations. She worked at the Canada Council for the Arts before becoming a Senior Arts Policy Advisor for the Department of Canadian Heritage. She directed the Centre for New Media at the Canadian Cultural Centre in Paris. She was the co-founder and director of the artist-run center Axe Néo-7 in Gatineau, Quebec. France is of Kanien’kehà:ka and French ancestry.

Chris Creighton-Kelly is an interdisciplinary artist, writer and cultural critic who was born in the UK of South Asian/British heritage. His performative, usually ephemeral artworks have been presented across Canada, in India, Europe and the USA. Chris is persistently interested in questions of absence in the Western world arts discourses...whose worldview is unquestioned; who has power; who does not and why? Over 30 years, Chris has worked as a consultant to many Canadian art organizations, institutions and agencies. His work with issues of racialized art politics is internationally recognized. He is currently co-Director of Primary Colours/Couleurs primaires, which uses decolonizing methodologies and centres the art practices of IBPoC artists within the Canadian art system. Chris appreciates his audiences a lot.

Co-presented by the Centre for inter-Media Arts and Decolonial Expression (CiMADE), OCADU and NSCAD Media Arts Division Supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, NSCAD Office of Academic Affairs and Research, CiMADE and Anna Leonowens Gallery
For more

Date
-
Venue & Address
Zoom, https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86801898267
Passcode: 1Prwm7
Cost
Free
Website
Type
Department
Keywords

Co-presented by the Centre for inter-Media Arts and Decolonial Expression (CiMADE), OCADU and NSCAD Media Arts Division Supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, NSCAD Office of Academic Affairs and Research, CiMADE and Anna Leonowens Gallery.

Event Display
Show when event is over
Image
from left to right: Chris Creighton-Kelly, France Trépanier
Body

Still from Thirza Cuthand’s Less Lethal Fetish (2019)

• January 29, 2021 • Socializing at 4:00pm • Talks begin 4:30 •

Drawing from artist and scholar David Garneau’s notion of a decolonial practice as one that offers direct challenges to “colonial habits” and worldviews, this panel with Niki Little, Howard Adler, and Thirza Cuthand explores the question of how curation can function as a decolonial practice.

Thirza Jean Cuthand (b. 1978 Regina SK) makes short experimental videos and films about sexuality, madness, Queer identity, love, and Indigeneity, which have screened in festivals and galleries internationally. She is Plains Cree/Scots, a member of Little Pine First Nation, and resides in Toronto, Canada.

Howard Adler is the Co-Director and Programmer of the Asinabka Festival which is an annual Indigenous film and media arts festival in the Nations Capital that allows independent artists - national, international, Indigenous, non-Indigenous - to share, present, and disseminate their work.

Niki Little | Wabiska Maengun is a mother, artist/observer, arts administrator, and the Artistic Director of the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival. She is Anishininew/English from Kistiganwacheeng (Garden Hill, FN), based between Win-nipi (Winnipeg, MB) and Tkaronto (Toronto, ON).

Please register at https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/curation-as-decolonial-practice-tickets-136885862299

Presented by the Toronto Film and Media Seminar.

Date
-
Venue & Address
Please register at https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/curation-as-decolonial-practice-tickets-136885862299
Website
Type
Digital Screen
Department
Keywords

This panel with Niki Little, Howard Adler, and Thirza Cuthand explores the question of how curation can function as a decolonial practice.

Banner Image
Still from Thirza Cuthand’s Less Lethal Fetish (2019)
Event Display
Hide when event is over

The form of the book — whether as novel, course text, or art book — draws from traditions that tend toward reflecting a social status quo. But the book and its related productions have tremendous potential to disrupt, disturb, and disentangle colonial legacies and point to new non-hierarchical principles. The course takes the question of the book and encourage these new possibilities, both through an intellectual and making process. Some considerations will include engaging with and responding to the inaugural Toronto Biennial of Art; reinterpreting the book through re-use, recycling, and remaking; intellectual/writing/discussion opportunities; theoretical and critical challenges posed by Indigenous, postcolonial, and decolonizing methods; and the production of an exhibition at the Graduate Gallery that reflects the pedagogies of the course.

Opening Reception and Grad Studies end of term celebration: November 29th from 5PM-10PM

Gallery Open Daily from November 29- December 2 from 7:30AM-7:30PM

Exhibitors:

Deborah Barnett

Jason Burke

Natalie Chuck

Jaime Hilditch

Cayden Johnson

Andrew Kostjuk

Ashok Mathur

Claudia McKnight

Victoria Milne

Patricia Pasten

Jevonne Peters

Sheetal Prasad

Katlin Walsh

Danny Walsh

Cost
Free
Email
gradstudies@ocadu.ca
Date
Venue & Address
Graduate Gallery 205 Richmond St. W.
Type
Department
Image
ocadu
Poster
Join the Decolonizing the Book grad students for a reception at their Open Circle exhibit and an end of year celebration for gra
Keywords

OCAD University is reinforcing its commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) within research with a grant from the federal government. The university has received $384,700 in funding over two years as part of a new program aimed at helping universities and colleges make the research community more diverse. The pilot program, Dimensions: Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Canada, was launched today by the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Sport.

The program aims to address systemic barriers, particularly those experienced by members of underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, including, but not limited to, women, Indigenous Peoples, persons with disabilities, members of visible minority/racialized groups, and members of LGBTQ2+ communities.

OCAD U’s project, co-led by Robert Luke, Vice President, Research and Innovation and Amanda Hotrum, Director, Diversity, Equity & Sustainability Initiatives, is titled “Building Institutional Capacity for Research, Equity, Decolonization, Diversity & Inclusion (REDDI).” The project extends the EDI to include decolonization, a key priority of the university’s Academic Plan, Strategic Research Plan, and its commitment to social and academic innovation.

The REDDI project will produce curriculum and training for all faculty and staff on equity issues as it pertains to engaging in research activities. The project will create a more supportive and inclusive research environment for all equity-seeking groups, including Black, Indigenous and People of Colour, people with disabilities, women, the neurodiverse, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, queer, questioning, and two-spirit.

Research Diversity, Equity & Sustainability (ODESI)
Image
ocadu default
Keywords
Date

Pagination

of 0
Subscribe to decolonization