CREATIVECITY CAMPUSARCHITECTS

We are thrilled to be part of the future of the University of Imagination. In partnership with Canada’s oldest and largest art, design and media university, we look forward to bringing new disciplines, minds and thoughts together to re-imagine the future, and collectively answer the questions of tomorrow.

Thom Mayne

Design Director, Morphosis

Key team Members

ARCHITECTURAL

Thom Mayne // Design Director (Morphosis)
Stephen Teeple // Primary Principal (Teeple)
Scott Lee // Project Lead/Manager (Morphosis)
Chris Radigan // Primary Project Lead/Manager (Teeple)
Brian Porter // Indigenous Architect (Two Row)
Stuart Franks // Project Designer (Morphosis)
Bernard Jin // Project Designer (Teeple)
Myles Craig // Contract Administration (Teeple)

CONSULTANTS

David Fox // Structural Principal (Entuitive)
James Hannaford // Mechanical Principal (TMP)
Shaili Patel // Electrical Principal (Mulvey & Banani)
Jennifer Nagai // Landscape Principal (PFS)
Lyle Scott // Footprint Smith & Anderson (Sustainability)
Paolo F. Albanese // Civil Principal (Fabian Papa & Partners)
Jon Soberman // Elevator Principal (Jon Soberman)
David Hine // Code Principal (David Hine Engineering)
Edward Trueman // Commissioning Principal (CFMS Consulting)
Udo Schliemann // Signage & Wayfinding Principal (Entro)
Morphosis

Morphosis is a collective practice committed to rigorous design and research that yields innovative buildings and urban environments. Founded in 1972 by Design Director Thom Mayne, the firm today consists of over 60 professionals engaged in architecture as a collaborative enterprise. Morphosis’ work encompasses a wide range of project types and scales including cultural, educational, commercial, and governmental buildings as well as large-scale urban masterplans. The firm maintain offices in Los Angeles, New York, and Shanghai, and site offices at projects worldwide. Morphosis is an industry leader in Building Information Modeling (BIM) and technological innovation; utilizing industry advances and an integrative design process, the firm seeks design choices that prioritize human health, wellbeing, and sustainability. Since its founding, Morphosis has received 26 Progressive Architecture awards, over 100 American Institute of Architects (AIA) awards, and numerous other honours. With Morphosis, Thom Mayne has been the recipient of the highest recognitions in architecture, including the Pritzker Prize (2005) and the AIA Gold Medal (2013).

  • Bill and Melinda Gates Hall

    Bill and Melinda Gates Hall

    Ithaca, NY

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  • Cornell Tech Bloomberg Center

    Cornell Tech Bloomberg Center

    Roosevelt Island, NY

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  • Cooper Square

    Cooper Square

    New York City, NY

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  • Emerson College

    Emerson College

    Los Angeles, CA

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  • Perot Museum of Nature and Science

    Perot Museum of Nature and Science

    Dallas, TX

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Bill and Melinda Gates Hall

Ithaca, NY

Bill & Melinda Gates Hall provides a joint, state-of-the-art facility for Cornell’s Computing Science and Information Science departments. The new academic building includes offices for staff and research fellows, conference and seminar rooms, dry labs, social and collaborative spaces, and a 200-person lecture hall. The building’s program is organized to create an active and vibrant environment for education and collaborative research.

Neighbouring the historic Barton Hall and Hoy Field, Gates Hall re-energizes a previously underutilized campus corner and establishes a new gateway to the University. Surfaced in vibrant stainless steel panels, the building’s cantilevered entry canopy covers an outdoor plaza and student social space defined by native landscaping and sculptural forms. The performative steel skin wraps the exterior façade in an angular weave, shading interior classrooms and creating a continuously dynamic and transformative surface. Advanced digital modeling tools used in designing the pattern, geometry, and details of the skin speak to the profound impact of computing on the arts and sciences.

Location
Bill & Melinda Gates Hall, Campus Rd, Ithaca, NY, 14853

Client
Cornell University

Size
101,455 ft2 / 60,708 m2

Program
Academic building with Lecture Hall, offices, conference rooms, seminar room, dry labs, and collaborative spaces

Design
2010-2011
Construction
2012-2014

LEED Rating (or similar)
Gold

Type
Educational

Bill and Melinda Gates Hall Bill and Melinda Gates Hall Bill and Melinda Gates Hall

 

 

 

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BLOOMBERG CENTER

Roosevelt Island, New York, USA

The Bloomberg Center is the first building to be completed at Cornell Tech, the new applied science campus on New York City’s Roosevelt Island. At Cornell Tech, Cornell University and Technion Israel Institute of Technology are joining together to create a new kind of institution that deepens connections between academia and industry. The campus co-locates graduate students with major tech companies and professional mentors to encourage entrepreneurial thinking and real-world research applications.

The four-story, 150,000 SF Bloomberg Center is Cornell Tech’s academic headquarters, where the majority of classes will be held and graduate research undertaken. To maximize use and opportunities for collaboration, the design challenges the notion of assigned rooms and private offices for faculty, instead providing a variety of open-ended spaces organized around a central social galleria.

With a net-zero design, the Bloomberg Center sets a new benchmark for sustainable building in New York City. The major performative feature is a broad energy canopy that supports a solar array while shading the building beneath.

Courtesy of Morphosis Architects.

Location
Roosevelt Island, New York

Client
Cornell Tech

Development Consultant
Robert Silverman

Site Area
0.8 acres / 0.3 hectares

Size
150,000 gross ft² / 13,935 gross m²

Program
Classrooms, instructional labs, lecture hall, huddle rooms, collaboration areas, conference rooms, cafe, classrooms, open work areas and shared spaces.

Design
2012 – 2014

Construction
2015 – 2017

LEED Rating
Platinum (Expected)

Type
Educational

BLOOMBERG CENTER BLOOMBERG CENTER BLOOMBERG CENTER

 

 

 

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41 COOPER SQUARE

New York, New York USA

Attaining a Platinum rating, 41 Cooper Square is the first LEED-certified academic laboratory building in New York City. The new facility is conceived as a vehicle to foster collaboration and cross-disciplinary dialogue among the three schools at Cooper Union, previously housed in separate locations. At the heart of the new building, an undulating lattice links social spaces on the upper floors with a 20-foot wide, four story grand stair rising from the entrance lobby. Functioning like a “vertical piazza”, this central social space provides for impromptu and planned meetings, student gatherings, lectures, and for the intellectual debate that defines the academic environment.

In the spirit of the institution’s dedication to accessible education, the building is symbolically open to the city, with visual transparencies and public spaces that connect to the neighbourhood. A public exhibition gallery, cafe and a two-hundred-seat auditorium at the ground-plane and a transparent double-skin invite the neighborhood to observe and to take part in the intensity of activity within. The double-skin also acts as an insulator to enhance heating and cooling efficiency. Further sustainability strategies include skip-stop elevators, roof-gardens, rain-water collection, and extensive day-lighting throughout the building.

Location
41 Cooper Square, New York City, New York, United States of America 10003

Client
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art

Size
175,000 gross sq ft / 16,258 gross sq m

Program
Academic and laboratory building with exhibition gallery, auditorium, lounge and multi-purpose space, and retail space

Design
2004 – 2006

Construction
2006 – 2009

LEED
Platinum

Type
Educational

41 COOPER SQUARE 41 COOPER SQUARE 41 COOPER SQUARE

 

 

 

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EMERSON COLLEGE LOS ANGELES

Los Angeles, California USA

Bringing student housing, instructional facilities, and administrative offices to one location, the new Emerson College Los Angeles (ELA) facility establishes a permanent home in the heart of Hollywood for Emerson College’s undergraduate internship program. Creating an interweaving of public, private, and semi-private spaces, the building evokes the concentrated energy of east-coast metropolitan centers in an iconic Los Angeles setting.

Bridged by a multi-use platform, two slender residential towers with housing for over 200 students frame a central open volume to create a flexible outdoor “room.” A sculpted form housing classrooms and offices weaves through the void, carving multi-level social terraces and active interstitial space. Exterior corridors to student suites and common rooms are shaded by an undulating, textured metal scrim spanning the full height of the towers’ interior face. On the exterior facades, a skin of dynamic louvers helps reduce solar gain and contributes to the facility’s LEED Gold rating. Open to the community, a café and dining space at street level links student life with the neighborhood.

Photos by Iwan Baan

Location
5960 W. Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90028

Client
Emerson College

Development Consultant
Robert Silverman

Site Area
0.8 acres / 0.3 hectares

Size
120,000 gross ft² (not including parking) / 11,148 gross m²

Program
Ground floor café and retail; classrooms, screening and mixing rooms; outdoor terraces; housing for approximately 217 students, along with faculty and staff; amenities, including a fitness center, lounge and kitchen; bike facilities and three levels of below-grade parking.

Design
2008 – 2011

Construction
2011 – 2014

LEED Rating
Gold

Type
Educational

EMERSON COLLEGE LOS ANGELES EMERSON COLLEGE LOS ANGELES EMERSON COLLEGE LOS ANGELES

 

 

 

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PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE

Dallas, Texas USA

The Perot Museum of Nature and Science creates a new identity for Dallas’ premier science museum, engaging a broad audience with multi-sensory, immersive learning environments. Rejecting the notion of museum architecture as a neutral background for exhibits, the building itself is designed as a didactic tool for demonstrating scientific principles at work.

The Museum is conceived around a narrative of connectivity and experience. The overall massing floats a cube of galleries above a thickened landscape containing classrooms, a theatre, and administrative spaces. A glass-encased 54-foot continuous flow escalator moves patrons up from the ground floor to a cantilevered platform offering expansive views of downtown Dallas. Visitors spiral downward through the galleries and atrium space, continuously returning back to views of the city as a means of orientation and pause between exhibits. As an institution aimed at enhancing the public understanding of natural systems, addressing and exemplifying environmental responsibility was a critical goal of the design. As well as achieving LEED Gold, four Green Globes, and a Sustainable Sites One-star rating, various strategies are used throughout the building to inspire learning and comprehension, including revealing the building structure and mechanical systems, fore-fronting energy-saving and water-reuse technologies, and integrating local ecologies into the landscaping.

Courtesy of Morphosis Architects.

Location
2201 N. Field Street, Dallas, Texas, United States of America 75201

Client
Museum of Nature and Science
Owner’s Representative
Hillwood Development

Site Area
4.7 acres / 1.9 hectares

Size
180,000 gross sq ft / 16,722 gross sq m

Program
Nature and science museum with galleries, theater, café, store, education, and office programs

Design
2008 – 2010

Construction
2010 – 2012

LEED Rating (or similar)
Gold, Four Green Globes & One-Star Sustainable Sites Initiative

Type
Cultural

PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE

 

 

 

THOM MAYNE

Design Director, Morphosis

Thom Mayne founded Morphosis as a collective architectural practice engaged in cross-disciplinary research and design. As Design Director and thought leader of Morphosis, Mayne provides overall vision and project leadership to the firm. With permanent offices in Los Angeles and New York City, the firm currently employs over 60 architects and designers.

Mayne’s distinguished honours include the Pritzker Prize (2005) and the AIA Gold Medal (2013).  He was appointed to the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities in 2009, and was honoured with the American Institute of Architects Los Angeles Gold Medal in 2000. With Morphosis, Thom Mayne has been the recipient of 26 Progressive Architecture Awards, over 100 American Institute of Architecture Awards and numerous other design recognitions. Under Mayne’s direction, the firm has been the subject of various group and solo exhibitions throughout the world, including a large solo exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris in 2006. Morphosis buildings and projects have been published extensively; the firm has been the subject of 33 monographs.

Throughout his career, Mayne has remained active in the academic world. In 1972, he helped found the Southern California Institute of Architecture. Since then, he has held teaching positions at Columbia, Yale (the Eliel Saarinen Chair in 1991), the Harvard Graduate School of Design (Eliot Noyes Chair in 1998), the Berlage Institute in the Netherlands, the Bartlett School of Architecture in London, and many other institutions around the world. There has always been a symbiotic relationship between Mayne’s teaching and practice, evidenced in his concurrent position as Executive Director of the Now Institute at UCLA, a research and design initiative focusing on applying strategic urban thinking to real world issues. He is a tenured Professor at UCLA Architecture and Urban Design since 1993.

Teeple Architects

From its inception in 1989, Teeple Architects has built a reputation for innovative design, technical excellence and exceptional service through a broad range of academic and institutional projects. On these, the firm has demonstrated a commitment to crafting design solutions in which the architectural concept is intimately linked to its specific context, day-to-day use and inhabitation. They have become renowned for innovative approaches to sustainability and efficiency, as well as construction, within complex settings. The firm has been recognized with major awards on the national and international levels—including a prestigious International Holcim Award for Sustainable Design and six Governor General’s Medals for Architecture.

  • Toronto Community Housing Corporation (TCHC)

    Toronto Community Housing Corporation (TCHC)

    60 Richmond St. E., Toronto, Canada

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  • Langara Science & Technology Building

    Langara Science & Technology Building

    Langara College, Vancouver, BC, Canada

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  • Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum

    Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum

    Wembley, Alberta, Canada

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  • Stephen Hawking Centre

    Stephen Hawking Centre

    Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

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  • Arctic College Expansion and Community Learning Centre

    Arctic College Expansion and Community Learning Centre

    Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada

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60 RICHMOND STREET EAST, Toronto Community Housing Corporation (TCHC)

Toronto, ON

60 Richmond Housing Co-operative is an 11-story, 85-unit mixed use building located in Toronto’s downtown core. The client program – to provide affordable housing for hospitality workers – was a key inspiration for the design which incorporates social spaces dedicated to food and its production.

The result is a small-scale, full-cycle system described as ‘urban permaculture’, where the resident-owned and operated restaurant and training kitchen on the ground floor is supplied with vegetables, fruit and herbs grown on the sixth floor terrace. The kitchen garden is irrigated by storm water that is collected on the roofs. Organic waste generated by the kitchens serves as compost for the garden.

60 Richmond was conceived a solid mass where volumes were subtracted and carved away in order to create openings, a courtyard space and terraces at various levels. The deconstructed volume creates interlocking and contrasting spaces stepping out and back from the street. This visually dynamic solution was instrumental in achieving several key objectives: Creating the 6th floor garden, drawing light into the interior spaces and providing outdoor green space.

This project stands as a model of future urbanism where imaginative architectural solutions can effectively address global environmental challenges.

60 RICHMOND STREET EAST 60 RICHMOND STREET EAST 60 RICHMOND STREET EAST 60 RICHMOND STREET EAST 60 RICHMOND STREET EAST

 

 

 

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LANGARA SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BUILDING, Langara College

Vancouver, BC

(Teeple Architects with Proscenium Architecture + Interiors)

This project is the third phase in the implementation of Langara College’s Master Plan (by Teeple Architects). As with the first two phases, the creation of a sustainable, vibrant indoor and outdoor environment is a key focus. The new building is a five-storey structure situated at a key entrance to the campus. The building is forms an iconic gateway into the campus, emphasized by a bold cantilever.

The building houses some of the most significant Departments at the College, brought together into a single, collaborative facility for the first time. The sciences, including chemistry, biology, physics/astronomy, nursing and computer Sciences, occupy the upper three levels, while consolidated students services and food service can be found on the lower two floors.

The three upper lab levels are designed to be flexible and adaptable for future change. Labs with the highest levels of service are situated near the top of the building, minimizing fume hood exhaust runs. This results in the creation of an economic, well organized and dynamic lab environment.

Collaborative spaces – including the dramatic ‘Vortex Lounge’ – permeate all levels to provide visual interconnectivity through the different program zones and facilitate to the greatest degree possible collaboration and interdisciplinary learner-focused education.

LANGARA SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BUILDING LANGARA SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BUILDING LANGARA SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BUILDING LANGARA SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BUILDING LANGARA SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BUILDING

 

 

 

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PHILIP J. CURRIE DINOSAUR MUSEUM, County of Grande Prairie No.1

Wembley, AB

(Teeple Architects with ATB)

The Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum aspires to become an internationally significant centre of paleontology in fossil-rich northern Alberta. Visitors to the museum move through a sequence of spaces and experiences that form an architectural narrative of the fascinating Pipestone Creek dinosaur bone-bed. They start at a re-creation of the bone-bed to learn the story of the present-day artifacts. They then see from a glass box cantilevered into the lab space the paleontologists studying and preparing artifacts.

Two massive retaining walls push back the earth to expose the museum floor four metres below to which visitors descend to see the assembled skeletons. As they journey north, the narrative switches back and slopes further down to the Devonian Gallery exhibiting Alberta’s pre-dinosaur history.

New technology was developed to construct the wood structure, and in particular, the nodes where up to eight large beams meet at a single point. The design team pioneered a technique of laminating plywood to create structural connections.

The extensive use of wood, much of it sourced from local mountain pine beetle killed forests, the barn-like post-and-beam structure and the raw aluminum cladding are references to the Peace River Country’s history of agriculture and forestry.

PHILIP J. CURRIE DINOSAUR MUSEUM PHILIP J. CURRIE DINOSAUR MUSEUM PHILIP J. CURRIE DINOSAUR MUSEUM PHILIP J. CURRIE DINOSAUR MUSEUM

 

 

 

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STEPHEN HAWKING CENTRE, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

Waterloo, ON

“We asked them to provide the optimal environment for the human mind to conceive of the universe”

- Neil Turok, Director, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

This major expansion project more than doubles the size of the world renowned physics research facility in Waterloo, ON. The form and architectural solution of the expansion focused on the creation of an interconnected, unified whole that encourages interaction among the various disciplines of physics.

The design strategy focused on creating a variety of ideal research environments including both quiet research spaces and areas for dialogue and collaboration. This dynamic interaction is fostered through visual interconnectivity, and the provision of a wide range of interaction opportunities, from small nooks in communal areas, to the Black Hole Bistro on the ground floor and Interaction Areas that break down the boundaries between floors, to innovative teaching spaces. All areas of the facility are hardwired to connect globally with latest audio-visual communications and IT infrastructure. The facility enables lectures, cultural performances and live demonstrations to be shared, while promoting communication and collaboration with communities afar.

STEPHEN HAWKING CENTRE STEPHEN HAWKING CENTRE STEPHEN HAWKING CENTRE STEPHEN HAWKING CENTRE STEPHEN HAWKING CENTRE STEPHEN HAWKING CENTRE

 

 

 

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ARCTIC COLLEGE EXPANSION AND COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTRE

Iqaluit, NU

(Teeple Architects with Cibinel Architecture)

The Nunavut Arctic College expansion and Community Learning Centre in Iqaluit is a major expansion of this vital academic and cultural institution.   At roughly 2,500 square metres, the new facility will welcome 269 students and 37 staff by August 2019. The expansion and addition program includes fine arts and multimedia classrooms, fisheries training facilities, digital labs, kitchen classrooms and other versatile learning spaces.  

The design of the building is rooted in the powerful landscape of Iqaluit and Baffin Island.  The building emerges from the dark bedrock of the hill behind as an ambiguously natural form, in part shaped by the wind to minimize drifting and to provide substantial protection from the elements at the entrance.  

A balance is achieved between the competing desires of insulating the building as much as possible against the arctic cold while simultaneously bringing in natural light and taking advantage of the beautiful views to the harbour and the landscape beyond. Strategic cuts through the roof scoop south light deep into the heart of the building and daylighting glass is used extensively to maximize the distribution of natural light. The internal organization maximizes transparency and spatial interconnectivity to foster student engagement and to break down potential social barriers.

ARCTIC COLLEGE EXPANSION AND COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTRE ARCTIC COLLEGE EXPANSION AND COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTRE ARCTIC COLLEGE EXPANSION AND COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTRE ARCTIC COLLEGE EXPANSION AND COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTRE ARCTIC COLLEGE EXPANSION AND COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTRE

 

 

 

Stephen Teeple

Founder and Principle, Teeple Architects

Stephen Teeple, founder and principal of Teeple Architects Inc., is a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts and the recipient of six Governor General’s Medals for Architecture—Canada’s top architectural recognition. Mr. Teeple is a prominent member of the Canadian design community, committed to active and ongoing engagement in all aspects of discourse regarding design, creativity and the public realm and was honoured to receive the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal in recognition of his outstanding service and contribution to Canadian design and culture in 2013.

Mr. Teeple’s recent work has explored the cultural dimension of sustainability in design, a practice he believes is in keeping with the architect’s responsibility to understand the evolving role of architecture in society. Throughout the evolution of his practice, there remains a consistent intent to pursue architecture as an art form—a resonant form that shapes human experience into a heightened level of felt expression. The work of Mr. Teeple and Teeple Architects has been recognized at both the national and international level for its inspired, intelligent and efficient responses to site, ecology and the specific and unique needs of each client.

Two Row Architects

Two Row Architect (TRA) operates as a sole proprietorship under the direction of Brian Porter (Oneida) with a main office located on the Six Nations of the Grand River territory and a satellite office located in Toronto. Since its inception in 1992, the firm has focused on providing services to projects for First Nations clients as well as those that incorporate Indigenous cultural ideologies and teachings manifested in architectural form. We, at Two Row, will assist in promoting an architectural approach that realizes the meshing of local traditional symbols (Indigenous arts/crafts/design) into current building technology. We also promote the creative and environmentally conscious use of building materials, and maximum Indigenous involvement for local benefit.

Two Row Architect has established design goals and parameters through a stringent review process of the comments, concerns and constraints we have encountered in numerous project meetings. We practice and re-invent these concepts, every day, to arrive at solutions that are contemporary, forward- thinking and functional.

Under the direction of Brian Porter, TRA currently has five employees, three of which are licensed architects in Ontario. Matthew Hickey (Mohawk) has been with TRA for 10 years and is a graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design. Rosalie Dawson, has been with TRA for two years and is also a graduate of OCAD University.

  • Allegany Administration Building

    Allegany Administration Building - Seneca Nation of Indians

    Salamanca, NY

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Allegany Administration Building - Seneca Nation of Indians

Salamanca, New York

ARCHITECTURAL NARRATIVE Indigeneity can be found in the Allegany Administration Building for the Seneca Nation of Indians on several layers. This facility was designed by way of Seneca Nation participation through workshops involving all personnel with individual community members as well. With a proud heritage and history, the goal was to reinterpret Seneca Culture in a modern, authentic and respectful manner. The stories of the Haudenausanee, and specifically the Onödowá’ga (Seneca), are woven through the fabric of the building, imbedded in its massing, directionality, site lines, programming and even in the ceramic fritting on its glass. Specific features that bring Seneca teachings to life can be seen throughout the facility and especially in feature spaces like the front entrance, the council chamber and the great hall. Designed through Seneca Nation Participation This facility was designed by way of Seneca Nation participation through workshops involving all personnel and community members as well. It had several levels of complexity that added to the depth of the consultation process. First, there were a large number of user groups involved which were previously housed in separate buildings, all to be accommodated under one roof. Second, the building design needed to reflect the historical Indigenous values of the Seneca Nation as well as projecting the modern capabilities of the Nation. And third, the previous Indigenous architect had been fired from the project in part due to a lack of consultation which made our approach even more important. For this project specifically, we designed a gaming session that utilized all of the required rooms as game pieces. We encouraged each department in conjunction with others to ‘play’ with the pieces on a game board that could accommodate multiple floor levels. Each session developed layouts for the spaces identified in the functional program. The sessions were informal and were designed to allow different user groups a chance to interact and provide input on the building layout. Furthermore, Two Row Architect was present at all sessions and was able to record stories, thoughts about what works and what doesn't work, the intricate inner workings of each department and what each user thought was important to see in the building. Reinterpret Seneca Culture in a Contemporary Facility Throughout the sessions, Two Row Architect heard time and again that the Seneca Nation is proud of their culture and history. We also heard that it was equally important for the design to be contemporary and incorporate all viable leading edge technologies. The design team was directed to incorporate cultural references in an authentic, respectful and appropriate manner without simply becoming a repository for historic references. Establishing a Campus A previous concept developed by others depicted a stand-alone facility that related to the adjacent Interstate Highway #80. Two Row Architect rejected this notion of highway-centric architecture in favour of a design whereby the Administration Building could have a physical relationship to the nearby Health Centre and Day Care. This would assist with inter-department operations, way-finding and encourage pedestrian activities. Areas adjacent to the Administration Building were identified for expansions and to-be-determined new structures. These master planning concepts envisage the establishment of a “campus” over time. Four Directions provide Organization Structure The layout of the facility is based on the four directions. This method of planning forms the basis for much Native American architecture and is as relevant today as it was in the past. The Administration Building has significant amounts of glass on the south side to take advantage of the passive energy of the sun. The north side has smaller openings and is clad with materials to provide protection from the winter winds. In occupying the building, users will experience a heightened awareness of the sun as it crosses the sky from morning to afternoon. Users will also be able to ‘measure’ the change of the seasons as marked by the high summer sun and the low winter sun. Grand Hall on North-South Axis The Grand Hall is positioned along the north-south axis and functions as the heart of the facility. It was designed to be welcoming, generous and open-ended to create vistas to the mountains beyond. Its curving roof structure is symbolic of the Allegheny River which has sustained the Seneca Nation for time immemorial. The space is proportioned much like a longhouse in its length and width. This Grand Hall is regularly utilized for large gatherings, important community meetings, celebrations and special events. Democratic Vertical Organization Interviews with the various departments determined those that would benefit from convenient access to the public. In typical corporate America, executive positions are located on higher floors levels in exclusive settings. The design team commends the governance of the Seneca Nation for locating their suites on the ground floor levels so that they may offer more immediate access to their membership and visitors. Other community oriented departments such as the newsletter, clerk’s office and the courts were given prime locations to better serve the public. Departments that are not frequently visited by the public were located on the upper floor levels. This vertical organization was complemented by a full height atrium located just inside the front door that allows for straightforward signage and easy way-finding. Amongst the Trees The departments are also positioned with respect to the open south face and the more secluded north face which is set against one of the strongest features on the site which is a grove of mature trees that runs along the northern edge of the site extents. The suites along this grove are literally ‘amongst the trees’. As envisaged by the design team, this secluded and naturalized area has become a refuge and contemplative outdoor area for staff and visitors alike. Incorporating Natural Materials Wherever prudent, the design team took the opportunity to introduce natural materials such as wood, stone and quarry tile to construct the Administration Building. The result is a warm and welcoming facility that avoids the institutional feel common in other administration centres. The finishes and systems have also been selected to be non-toxic and engineered to achieve a healthy indoor air quality. These measures have resulted in an environment that is conducive to the variety of uses that were desired to be hosted in the facility by the Seneca Nation. Homage to Haudenosaunee Iron Workers Since the inception of the firm in 1992, Two Row Architect has been a strong proponent of Indigenous inclusion and has consistently promoted the optimum use of local Indigenous workforces on numerous projects over the past 24 years. The Allegany Administration building was no different. Knowing that the Haudenasaunee have a rich history with red iron construction, the design placed special importance on this construction technique. Two Row Architect also worked with the local Seneca Construction Management Corporation to facilitate a project that was completed on time on budget in spite the challenges associated with a ‘fast track’ construction process. The Evergrowing Tree One of the most prominent features of the Administration Building is the stylized window treatment over the main entrance. From a technical standpoint, the treatment assists in reflecting those seasonal rays of the sun that are unwanted. From a cultural standpoint, it recalls the Evergrowing Tree Wampum Belt that represents peace and strength. If any man or nation outside of the Haudenasaunee Confederacy wishes to obey the Great Law of Peace, they may follow one of its four roots back to be welcomed and take shelter beneath the Tree of the Long Needles. The Council Chamber and the 13 Phases of the Moon The Council Chamber is located to the left of the main entrance and immediately stands out from the balance of the Administration Building. It was conceived as a precious space with an inward focus. The seating arrangement selected by the governance of the Seneca Nation invites the public to ‘complete the circle’ as deliberations take place in an inclusive and non-hierarchical environment. The oval shaped chamber is supported by thirteen columns that represent the phases of the moon over the calendar year. The odd number of columns and the construction of the roof posed a unique challenge for the architects and engineers. They are pleased with the outcome that is achieved through the use of wood, steel and glass to provide a dynamic interior befitting of this sacred space. Landscaped Terrace and Green Roof The second floor outdoor terrace off the west wing provides one of the more surprising spaces within the facility. With its spectacular views to the surrounding landscape and nearby Allegany Casino, this terrace allows for outdoor functions to take place in an informal and controlled environment. One section of the terrace has been constructed as a ‘green roof’ that is vegetated with sedum. This hardy species is able to withstand both drought and downpour conditions. It is an attractive and low maintenance feature that contributes to the performance of the facility by reducing heat gain and storm water runoff. Indigenous Species The focus of the landscape design was to treat storm water management not as an engineering issue but as a design feature. A series of ponds were incorporated to collect rainfall and filter it through natural means prior to its eventual outflow into the Allegheny River. This was achieved through a landscaping plan that reintroduced indigenous species that are naturally drought resistant and self-seeding. An emphasis was also placed on promoting biodiversity and select plants were specified due to their healing properties and cultural significance amongst the Seneca Nation. Outdoor Gathering Circle – Homage to Veterans The landscape plan included an outdoor gathering circle to pay homage to the veterans that served during various conflicts. Largely achieved through the use of earth and stone, the circle is highlighted on its north side by a black granite monument and flagpoles that can be seen from the interior suite of the justice department.

Allegany Administration Building - Seneca Nation of Indians Allegany Administration Building - Seneca Nation of Indians Allegany Administration Building - Seneca Nation of Indians